Ensure Access to Disability Insurance for Individuals with ALS: Cosponsor the ALS Disability Insurance Access Act — DEADLINE FEB. 8TH

ALS has devastating financial implications for patients and their families.  Due to the debilitating nature of the disease, most people diagnosed with ALS lose their jobs and employer-based insurance during the most challenging periods of their lives.  This
burden is compounded by the requirement that people with ALS must wait five months before they can receive the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits that they have earned. 

The SSDI five-month waiting period is intended to be long enough to allow temporary conditions to reverse and to discourage those who can work from electing to not work.  But as ALS patients and their families know, ALS is never temporary or reversible.  In
fact, because of its degenerative and aggressive nature, some people living with ALS will lose their fight with the disease before the five-month waiting period has even ended.
 

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Protect our Coastal Communities – Cosponsor H.R. 6288

Over forty percent of the American population lives near the coast, and according to the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), that number is expected to increase by an additional 10 million people, or eight percent, by 2020. Despite
the growing number of Americans residing in our coastal communities, these areas are facing unprecedented threats from sea-level rise, coastal ecosystem degradation, and extreme weather events.

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Cosponsor H.R. 6611 – the HEADs UP Act — Legislation to Designate People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities as a Medically Underserved Population

Thursday, July 26, 2018 marks the 28th anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act, groundbreaking legislation that extended civil rights law to prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities. We have made significant
progress since this bill was signed in 1990 by President George H.W. Bush, but still have a long way to go when it comes to fully integrating people with disabilities into our communities. One such example of where we are failing is in the field of healthcare;
people with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) experience poorer health outcomes, shortened life expectancies, and lack access to even the most basic forms of care when compared to the non-disabled population.

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Cosponsor H.R. 6611 – the HEADs UP Act — Legislation to Designate People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities as a Medically Underserved Population

Thursday, July 26, 2018 marks the 28th anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act, groundbreaking legislation that extended civil rights law to prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities. We have made significant
progress since this bill was signed in 1990 by President George H.W. Bush, but still have a long way to go when it comes to fully integrating people with disabilities into our communities. One such example of where we are failing is in the field of healthcare;
people with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) experience poorer health outcomes, shortened life expectancies, and lack access to even the most basic forms of care when compared to the non-disabled population.

Read More

Cosponsor H.R. 6611 – the HEADs UP Act — Legislation to Designate People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities as a Medically Underserved Population

Thursday, July 26, 2018 marks the 28th anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act, groundbreaking legislation that extended civil rights law to prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities. We have made significant
progress since this bill was signed in 1990 by President George H.W. Bush, but still have a long way to go when it comes to fully integrating people with disabilities into our communities. One such example of where we are failing is in the field of healthcare;
people with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) experience poorer health outcomes, shortened life expectancies, and lack access to even the most basic forms of care when compared to the non-disabled population.

Read More