Co-sponsor the bicameral COUNT Victims Act

On May 29, a group of independent researchers from Harvard University released a report estimating the number of deaths caused by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico.[1] It uncovered a sobering
figure of 4,654 lives that could have been lost as a result of the storm, many of them from delayed medical care. This is staggeringly higher than the official estimates. While much debate has ensued over the validity of the number, the truth is we may never
know the exact number of all lives lost. Amid a new hurricane season, we need to ensure transparency and oversight.

Read More

Co-sponsor the bicameral COUNT Victims Act

On May 29, a group of independent researchers from Harvard University released a report estimating the number of deaths caused by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico.[1] It uncovered a sobering
figure of 4,654 lives that could have been lost as a result of the storm, many of them from delayed medical care. This is staggeringly higher than the official estimates. While much debate has ensued over the validity of the number, the truth is we may never
know the exact number of all lives lost. Amid a new hurricane season, we need to ensure transparency and oversight.

Read More

Support the bicameral COUNT Victims Act

On May 29, a group of independent researchers from Harvard University released a report estimating the number of deaths caused by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico.[1] It uncovered a sobering
figure of 4,654 lives that could have been lost as a result of the storm, many of them from delayed medical care. This is staggeringly higher than the official estimates. While much debate has ensued over the validity of the number, the truth is we may never
know the exact number of all lives lost. Amid a new hurricane season, we need to ensure transparency and oversight.

Read More

Support the bicameral COUNT Victims Act

On May 29, a group of independent researchers from Harvard University released a report estimating the number of deaths caused by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico.[1] It uncovered a sobering
figure of 4,654 lives that could have been lost as a result of the storm, many of them from delayed medical care. This is staggeringly higher than the official estimates. While much debate has ensued over the validity of the number, the truth is we may never
know the exact number of all lives lost. Amid a new hurricane season, we need to ensure transparency and oversight.

Read More

Support the bicameral COUNT Victims Act

On May 29, a group of independent researchers from Harvard University released a report estimating the number of deaths caused by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico.[1] It uncovered a sobering
figure of 4,654 lives that could have been lost as a result of the storm, many of them from delayed medical care. This is staggeringly higher than the official estimates. While much debate has ensued over the validity of the number, the truth is we may never
know the exact number of all lives lost. Amid a new hurricane season, we need to ensure transparency and oversight.

Read More

Support the bicameral COUNT Victims Act

On May 29, a group of independent researchers from Harvard University released a report estimating the number of deaths caused by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico.[1] It uncovered a sobering
figure of 4,654 lives that could have been lost as a result of the storm, many of them from delayed medical care. This is staggeringly higher than the official estimates. While much debate has ensued over the validity of the number, the truth is we may never
know the exact number of all lives lost. Amid a new hurricane season, we need to ensure transparency and oversight.

Read More

Support the bicameral COUNT Victims Act

On May 29, a group of independent researchers from Harvard University released a report estimating the number of deaths caused by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico.[1] It uncovered a sobering
figure of 4,654 lives that could have been lost as a result of the storm, many of them from delayed medical care. This is staggeringly higher than the official estimates. While much debate has ensued over the validity of the number, the truth is we may never
know the exact number of all lives lost. Amid a new hurricane season, we need to ensure transparency and oversight.

Read More

Support the bicameral COUNT Victims Act

On May 29, a group of independent researchers from Harvard University released a report estimating the number of deaths caused by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico.[1] It uncovered a sobering
figure of 4,654 lives that could have been lost as a result of the storm, many of them from delayed medical care. This is staggeringly higher than the official estimates. While much debate has ensued over the validity of the number, the truth is we may never
know the exact number of all lives lost. Amid a new hurricane season, we need to ensure transparency and oversight.

Read More

CLOSING NOW – ROUND 2: Support A Fair Process For Colleges in Puerto Rico

Betsy DeVos has struck Puerto Rico again. Despite
massive public outcry in opposition, the Department of Education is ignoring Congressional and stakeholder input, and is moving forward with an incredibly unfair process for colleges and universities to apply for and access disaster aid funding. On April
5, I, along with 46 of my colleagues in both chambers, sent the Secretary a
letter expressing our concerns and providing suggestions for how the Department could modify its process so that it is more responsive to Puerto Rico’s uniquely desperate situation.

Read More

DEADLINE EXTENDED COB TODAY – ROUND 2: Support A Fair Process For Colleges in Puerto Rico

Betsy DeVos has struck Puerto Rico again. Despite
massive public outcry in opposition, the Department of Education is ignoring Congressional and stakeholder input, and is moving forward with an incredibly unfair process for colleges and universities to apply for and access disaster aid funding. On April
5, I, along with 46 of my colleagues in both chambers, sent the Secretary a
letter expressing our concerns and providing suggestions for how the Department could modify its process so that it is more responsive to Puerto Rico’s uniquely desperate situation.

Read More