Call for original co-sponsors on the LIVER Act – Support robust research and funding for liver cancer and liver illness initiatives

In 2018, approximately 42,220 people in the United States will be diagnosed with primary liver cancer, and approximately 30,200 will die from the disease because it is rarely detected sufficiently early for successful treatment.[1]
The five-year survival rate of 18 percent makes liver cancer one of the deadliest forms of cancer,[2] and though the overall cancer death rate has decreased recently, the liver cancer death rate is on the rise.[3]
Furthermore, early detection is key towards a higher survival rate. When diagnosed in the early stages, liver cancer has a five-year survival rate of 31 percent,[4] but shrinks drastically to only 3 percent when
liver cancer is diagnosed in the later stages.[5]

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Call for original co-sponsors on the LIVER Act – Support robust research and funding for liver cancer and liver illness initiatives

In 2018, approximately 42,220 people in the United States will be diagnosed with primary liver cancer, and approximately 30,200 will die from the disease because it is rarely detected sufficiently early for successful treatment.[1]
The five-year survival rate of 18 percent makes liver cancer one of the deadliest forms of cancer,[2] and though the overall cancer death rate has decreased recently, the liver cancer death rate is on the rise.[3]
Furthermore, early detection is key towards a higher survival rate. When diagnosed in the early stages, liver cancer has a five-year survival rate of 31 percent,[4] but shrinks drastically to only 3 percent when
liver cancer is diagnosed in the later stages.[5]

Read More

Call for original co-sponsors on the LIVER Act – Support robust research and funding for liver cancer and liver illness initiatives

In 2018, approximately 42,220 people in the United States will be diagnosed with primary liver cancer, and approximately 30,200 will die from the disease because it is rarely detected sufficiently early for successful treatment.[1]
The five-year survival rate of 18 percent makes liver cancer one of the deadliest forms of cancer,[2] and though the overall cancer death rate has decreased recently, the liver cancer death rate is on the rise.[3]
Furthermore, early detection is key towards a higher survival rate. When diagnosed in the early stages, liver cancer has a five-year survival rate of 31 percent,[4] but shrinks drastically to only 3 percent when
liver cancer is diagnosed in the later stages.[5]

Read More