Support the Inclusion of Children in NIH-Sponsored Clinical Trials

The inclusion of children in human subjects’ research is essential to ensure that children benefit from important scientific advances, as well as for understanding how diseases develop and persist later into adulthood. While the National Institutes of Health (NIH) formally encourages the inclusion of children as research participants in its clinical trials, we are concerned that the NIH is not adequately tracking whether children are appropriately included in all of its clinical trials relevant to child health. Consequently we are seeking your support for a letter to NIH Director Collins encouraging him to formally respond to report language accompanying the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016 that directs NIH to collect data and report publicly on the actual numbers of children in the various pediatric age groups that are enrolled in its clinical studies.

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Continue the Fight against Underage Drinking – Cosponsor the STOP Act Reauthorization (v. 2)

In 2006, Congress passed the Sober Truth on Preventing (STOP) Underage Drinking Act with unanimous bipartisan and bicameral support to address the public health crisis of underage drinking. Ten years after the passage of the STOP Act, it is clear that its comprehensive approach is making a difference: According to the 2015 Monitoring the Future survey, alcohol use by 8th, 10th, and 12th graders are at their lowest levels in decades.

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Continue the Fight against Underage Drinking – Cosponsor the STOP Act Reauthorization

In 2006, Congress passed the Sober Truth on Preventing (STOP) Underage Drinking Act with unanimous bipartisan and bicameral support to address the public health crisis of underage drinking. Ten years after the passage of the STOP Act, it is clear that its comprehensive approach is making a difference: According to the 2015 Monitoring the Future survey, alcohol use by 8th, 10th, and 12th graders are at their lowest levels in decades.

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Briefing on Gender-Based Violence and the Workplace, 1/26/16, 11:00 a.m.

By now, you should have received an invitation to a briefing on Gender-Based Violence and the Workplace hosted by Futures Without Violence, Jewish Women International, Legal Momentum, National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, National Latin@ Network: Casa de Esperanza, National Network to End Domestic Violence, and the Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence/Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence.

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Briefing on Gender-Based Violence and the Workplace, 1/26/16, 11:00 a.m.

By now, you should have received an invitation to the Gender-Based Violence and the Workplace briefing on Monday, January 25, 2016 at 11:00 am at Congressional Meeting Room South, Capitol Visitor Center, hosted by Futures Without Violence, Jewish Women International, Legal Momentum, National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, National Latin@ Network: Casa de Esperanza, National Network to End Domestic Violence, and the Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence/Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence.

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Join the Congressional Caucus on Maternity Care (v. 3)

Women are 51 percent of our country’s population – the majority of whom are the age where they’re having kids, or they are already caring for children or grandchildren. Each year, approximately 4 million women give birth in this country. The U.S. spends significantly more per capita on childbirth than any other industrialized nation, with cumulative costs estimated to be well over $50 billion. However, despite this investment, America continues to rank far behind almost all other developed countries in birth outcomes for both mothers and babies.

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Join the Congressional Caucus on Maternity Care

Women are 51 percent of our country’s population – the majority of whom are the age where they’re having kids, or they are already caring for children or grandchildren. Each year, approximately 4 million women give birth in this country. The U.S. spends significantly more per capita on childbirth than any other industrialized nation, with cumulative costs estimated to be well over $50 billion. However, despite this investment, America continues to rank far behind almost all other developed countries in birth outcomes for both mothers and babies.

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Cosponsor H.R. 3841, the SAFE Act, to Support Workplace Protections for Domestic Violence Victims

When we talk about victims of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, stalking, and revenge pornography, we often ignore that this abuse can have a severe economic impact on victims. It can cost victims their jobs, their homes, their health, and their
insurance – and, in cases of domestic violence, reinforce their dependency on their abusers as a result. This is chilling, and it must stop. Although we have come a long way since the days when domestic violence was “just a family issue” and a “pre-existing
condition,” there is no question there is much more to do to combat this ongoing public health epidemic. One in four women and one in seven men have suffered physical violence by an intimate partner, which has a devastating impact on a survivor’s physical
and emotional health, as well as their financial security. And victims of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, stalking, and revenge pornography often find that abuse and threats follow them from home into the workplace.

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