Protect Health Care and Social Service Workers from Violence on the Job

Health care and social service workers aim to make their patients and clients well, however, Department of Labor statistics show they face an outsized risk of on-the-job violence. Nurses, emergency room physicians, social workers, psychiatric facility aides,
and other health care and social service workers report that violence–most often from patients and those accompanying them–results in injury, loss of productivity, and serious safety concerns. A 2016 GAO study reported that rates of violence against health
care workers are up to 12 times higher than rates for the overall workforce. In 2016, 70% of all nonfatal workplace assaults occurred in the health care and social service sectors. A 2018 survey conducted by the American College of Emergency Physicians found
that 47% of emergency room doctors have been physically assaulted at work, and 8 in 10 workers surveyed report that this violence is affecting patient care.

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Call for Original Cosponsors: Protect Health Care and Social Service Workers from Violence on the Job

Health care and social service workers aim to make their patients and clients well, however, Department of Labor statistics show they face an outsized risk of on-the-job violence. Nurses, emergency room physicians, social workers, psychiatric facility aides,
and other health care and social service workers report that violence–most often from patients and those accompanying them–results in injury, loss of productivity, and serious safety concerns. A 2016 GAO study reported that rates of violence against health
care workers are up to 12 times higher than rates for the overall workforce. In 2016, 70% of all nonfatal workplace assaults occurred in the health care and social service sectors. A 2018 survey conducted by the American College of Emergency Physicians found
that 47% of emergency room doctors have been physically assaulted at work, and 8 in 10 workers surveyed report that this violence is affecting patient care.

Read More

Protect Health Care and Social Service Workers from Violence on the Job

Health care and social service workers aim to make their patients and clients well, however, Department of Labor statistics show  they face an outsized risk of on-the-job violence. Nurses, emergency room physicians, social workers, psychiatric facility aides,
and other health care and social service workers report that violence–often from patients and those accompanying them–results in injury, loss of productivity, and serious safety concerns.
 A 2016 GAO study reported that rates of violence against health care workers are up to 12 times higher than rates for the overall workforce. In 2016, 70% of all nonfatal workplace assaults occurred in the
health care and social service sectors. A 2018 survey conducted by the American College of Emergency Physicians found that 47% of emergency room doctors have been physically assaulted at work, and 8 in 10 workers surveyed report that this violence is affecting
patient care. 

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Call for Original Cosponsors – Commemorate 100 Years of U.S.-Australia Mateship

On July 4, 1918, American and Australian troops first fought alongside one another, in the Battle of Hamel on the Western Front in World War I. The force was commanded by Australian general Sir John Monash; the Allies achieved their objectives in 93 minutes,
and repelled a German counterattack later that night. The combined arms tactics demonstrated at Hamel were employed on a larger scale at the pivotal Battle of Amiens, and proved a major factor toward the Allies’ ultimate victory.    

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Former Navy Leaders Support Increased Submarine Construction

Our nation’s attack submarine force provides critical force projection, intelligence gathering, and force protection capabilities to the Navy and to the nation. But military leaders have testified to Congress that our submarine force is overstretched and
struggles to meet military requirements.

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Support Bipartisan Amendment #29 to Increase Submarine Construction

We write to request your support for Courtney-Wittman Amendment #29 to H.R. 6147, the Department of Defense Appropriations Act for FY 2019. This amendment, cosponsored by a bipartisan coalition of 23 Members, would provide funding
for long lead time materials to construct two additional Virginia-class submarines during the next five-year block contract, due to be signed by the end of 2018.

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Facts About Courtney-Wittman Amendment #29 to FY19 Defense Appropriations

We invite you to VOTE YES on amendment #29 to H.R. 6157, the 2019 Department of Defense Appropriations Act, providing funding for long lead time materials to construct additional
Virginia-class submarines in FY 2022 and FY 2023. We understand that members may approach the debate on this amendment from many different perspectives, and we appreciate he opportunity to have a debate on the merits of our amendment. We hope
you have had the chance to review a prior dear colleague laying out our core argument.
[link]

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Former Navy Leaders Support Increased Submarine Construction

Our nation’s attack submarine force provides critical force projection, intelligence gathering, and force protection capabilities to the Navy and to the nation. But military leaders have testified to Congress that our submarine force is overstretched and
struggles to meet military requirements.

Read More