LAST CALL: Join Us in Urging U.S. Airlines to Carry Opioid Reversal Drugs on Flights

There have been multiple reports of opioid overdoses occurring in the air, including reports over the summer of a passenger who died from an overdose while on a cross-country flight from Boston to Los Angeles. The reports stated that although those onboard
tried to administer care, they did not have access to naloxone, an opioid antagonist, that may have saved the passenger’s life.
In response to an initial letter in August, FAA Administrator Dickson recognized “the need to update emergency medical kits to include opioid antagonists” on airplanes and stated that “the FAA will seek to encourage the expeditious and voluntary
inclusion of opioid antagonists in the [medical] kits.” Many airlines, including American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, Alaska Airlines, and Frontier Airlines, have voluntarily agreed to stock naloxone on their planes.

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Join Us in Urging U.S. Airlines to Carry Opioid Reversal Drugs on Flights

There have been multiple reports of opioid overdoses occurring in the air, including reports over the summer of a passenger who died from an overdose while on a cross-country flight from Boston to Los Angeles. The reports stated that although those onboard
tried to administer care, they did not have access to naloxone, an opioid antagonist, that may have saved the passenger’s life.
In response to an initial letter in August, FAA Administrator Dickson recognized “the need to update emergency medical kits to include opioid antagonists” on airplanes and stated that “the FAA will seek to encourage the expeditious and voluntary
inclusion of opioid antagonists in the [medical] kits.” Many airlines, including American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, Alaska Airlines, and Frontier Airlines, have voluntarily agreed to stock naloxone on their planes.

Read More

Join Us in Urging U.S. Airlines to Carry Opioid Reversal Drugs on Flights

There have been multiple reports of opioid overdoses occurring in the air, including reports over the summer of a passenger who died from an overdose while on a cross-country flight from Boston to Los Angeles. The reports stated that although those onboard
tried to administer care, they did not have access to naloxone, an opioid antagonist, that may have saved the passenger’s life.
In response to an initial letter in August, FAA Administrator Dickson recognized “the need to update emergency medical kits to include opioid antagonists” on airplanes and stated that “the FAA will seek to encourage the expeditious and voluntary
inclusion of opioid antagonists in the [medical] kits.” Many airlines, including American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, Alaska Airlines, and Frontier Airlines, have voluntarily agreed to stock naloxone on their planes.

Read More