LAST CALL – Protect Lawful Asylum – Join Letter to Attorney General Sessions – CLOSING FRIDAY 9/7/18

America’s asylum laws and protections are being shredded due to a series of actions taken by U.S. Attorney General Sessions and directives issued by the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security. Key among these is the June 11th decision taken
by Attorney General Sessions that gang-related, domestic and gender-based violence are no longer eligible grounds for seeking asylum. In the latter two, this required the Attorney General to vacate the Board of Immigration Appeals decision in the
Matter of A-B- and overturn the Matter of A-R-C-G, which significantly limits the ability of survivors of domestic violence to gain asylum. Over a decade of U.S. case law and precedent have upheld domestic violence as grounds for seeking asylum.
Further, it is self-defeating to pretend that, amidst the humanitarian crisis in the Northern Triangle of Central America, individual asylum claims by those fleeing the region that involve domestic violence, gang violence, or other acute harm by state and
non-state actors cannot constitute a basis for a credible fear of persecution.

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CLOSING COB TODAY – Protect Lawful Asylum – Join Letter to Attorney General Sessions

America’s asylum laws and protections are being shredded due to a series of actions taken by U.S. Attorney General Sessions and directives issued by the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security. Key among these is the June 11th decision taken
by Attorney General Sessions that gang-related, domestic and gender-based violence are no longer eligible grounds for seeking asylum. In the latter two, this required the Attorney General to vacate the Board of Immigration Appeals decision in the
Matter of A-B- and overturn the Matter of A-R-C-G, which significantly limits the ability of survivors of domestic violence to gain asylum. Over a decade of U.S. case law and precedent have upheld domestic violence as grounds for seeking asylum.
Further, it is self-defeating to pretend that, amidst the humanitarian crisis in the Northern Triangle of Central America, individual asylum claims by those fleeing the region that involve domestic violence, gang violence, or other acute harm by state and
non-state actors cannot constitute a basis for a credible fear of persecution.

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CLOSING FRIDAY COB – Protect Lawful Asylum – Letter to Attorney General Sessions

America’s asylum laws and protections are being shredded due to a series of actions taken by U.S. Attorney General Sessions and directives issued by the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security. Key among these is the June 11th decision taken
by Attorney General Sessions that gang-related, domestic and gender-based violence are no longer eligible grounds for seeking asylum. In the latter two, this required the Attorney General to vacate the Board of Immigration Appeals decision in the
Matter of A-B- and overturn the Matter of A-R-C-G, which significantly limits the ability of survivors of domestic violence to gain asylum. Over a decade of U.S. case law and precedent have upheld domestic violence as grounds for seeking asylum.
Further, it is self-defeating to pretend that, amidst the humanitarian crisis in the Northern Triangle of Central America, individual asylum claims by those fleeing the region that involve domestic violence, gang violence, or other acute harm by state and
non-state actors cannot constitute a basis for a credible fear of persecution.

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DEADLINE FRIDAY COB – Protect Lawful Asylum – Letter to AG Sessions

America’s asylum laws and protections are being shredded due to a series of actions taken by U.S. Attorney General Sessions and directives issued by the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security. Key among these is the June 11th decision taken
by Attorney General Sessions that gang-related, domestic and gender-based violence are no longer eligible grounds for seeking asylum. In the latter two, this required the Attorney General to vacate the Board of Immigration Appeals decision in the
Matter of A-B- and overturn the Matter of A-R-C-G, which significantly limits the ability of survivors of domestic violence to gain asylum. Over a decade of U.S. case law and precedent have upheld domestic violence as grounds for seeking asylum.
Further, it is self-defeating to pretend that, amidst the humanitarian crisis in the Northern Triangle of Central America, individual asylum claims by those fleeing the region that involve domestic violence, gang violence, or other acute harm by state and
non-state actors cannot constitute a basis for a credible fear of persecution.

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Uphold Lawful Asylum – Letter to Attorney General Sessions – COB Friday, September 7th, Deadline

America’s asylum laws and protections are being shredded due to a series of actions taken by U.S. Attorney General Sessions and directives issued by the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security. Key among these is the June 11th decision taken
by Attorney General Sessions that gang-related, domestic and gender-based violence are no longer eligible grounds for seeking asylum. In the latter two, this required the Attorney General to vacate the Board of Immigration Appeals decision in the
Matter of A-B- and overturn the Matter of A-R-C-G, which significantly limits the ability of survivors of domestic violence to gain asylum. Over a decade of U.S. case law and precedent have upheld domestic violence as grounds for seeking asylum.
Further, it is self-defeating to pretend that, amidst the humanitarian crisis in the Northern Triangle of Central America, individual asylum claims by those fleeing the region that involve domestic violence, gang violence, or other acute harm by state and
non-state actors cannot constitute a basis for a credible fear of persecution.

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Support McGovern-Emmer Amendment 10 to NDAA

Our amendment to the NDAA would require the Department of Defense to design and produce a military service medal to honor retired and former members of the Armed Forces who are radiation-exposed veterans. This would include members of our Armed Forces who
participated in above-ground nuclear weapons testing; were part of the U.S. military occupation forces in or around Hiroshima and Nagasaki before 1946; or were held as POWs in or near Hiroshima or Nagasaki. This amendment unanimously passed the House
last year by a vote of 424-0.

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