Support H.R. 4404 to Ensure Patients are Adequately Informed and Empowered about their Prescriptions

There are millions of Americans who are taking prescribed and over-the-counter medication that can greatly increase the risk of suicide or depression.  Therefore, it is critically important that those risk factors are prominently displayed on the medication
to ensure that patients, along with their health care provider and pharmacist, can have a more thorough discussion as it relates to patient safety and awareness of harmful side effects.

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Cosponsor the Insulin Access for All Act

Access to insulin can improve — and even save — countless lives.  That’s why in 1921, the scientists who isolated insulin sold the patent for this procedure to the University of Toronto for $3, and for decades, insulin was affordable for those who relied
on it.

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Meet the Neighbors! Support the United States-Cuba Relations Normalization Act

While considerable progress has been made toward normalizing relations with Cuba, under the current administration we have taken step backwards such as reimposing restrictions on trade and travel with Cuba.  Measures such as these hurt American citizens,
workers, and industries.  I believe that we need to move forward, not backward, and work to create a more cooperative future with Cuba.

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Support Minority, Women, and Low-Income Banks & Credit Unions

Black banks have long
served low- and moderate-income neighborhoods by providing mortgages, opportunities to build credit, and welcoming places to deposit earnings, but they are now in danger of disappearing.  The
New Market Tax Credit (NMTC), a venture capital program intended to attract investment to these lower income neighborhoods which need it the most, has instead put money in the pockets of a few wealthy developers. 
Additionally, the Great Recession hit black banks hard.  Creative Investment Research, a firm that monitors minority-owned financial institutions, found that nearly a quarter have gone out of business, and predicts there will only be seven left in the entire
country by 2028 if the status quo does not change.

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Remember the Fallen: Cosponsor the Fort Pillow National Battlefield Park Study Act

From 1861 to 1865, the bloody American Civil War pitted the Union against the Confederate States of America.  The many battles that took place during the war saw both heroic actions and acts of brutality, culminating with the surrender of the Confederacy
at Appomattox Court House.  Today we are knowledgeable about these events due to the many studies and the abundance of research that has been done surrounding the Civil War.  However, the experiences and contributions of black soldiers have often been overlooked
in the wider narrative surrounding the Civil War.

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Keep Our Genes Private: Support the Genetic Information Privacy Act of 2019

Whether it is to learn more about their ancestry or their predisposition to disease, every day, U.S. citizens send their genetic information to testing services.  But
many U.S. citizens are unaware of what happens to their genetic information after they send it in.  Services that conduct genetic tests on consumers receive a wealth of genetic information that includes both intimate and personally identifiable information. 
These services are then able to sell their consumers’ data to third parties without their consent.

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Support Minority, Women, and Low-Income Banks & Credit Unions

Black banks have long served low- and moderate-income neighborhoods by providing mortgages, opportunities to build credit, and welcoming places to deposit earnings,
but they are now in danger of disappearing.  The New Market Tax Credit (NMTC), a venture capital program intended to attract investment to these lower income neighborhoods which need it the most, has instead
put money in the pockets of a few wealthy developers.  Additionally, the Great Recession hit black banks hard.  Creative Investment Research, a firm that monitors minority-owned financial institutions, found that nearly a quarter have gone out of business,
and predicts there will only be seven left in the entire country by 2028 if the status quo does not change.

Read More