Enforce Our Existing “Ship American” Laws

Please join us in sending a letter to the Secretary of Transportation and the Secretary of Defense urging their assistance in ensuring full enforcement of our existing “Ship American” laws for government-impelled cargo. These laws, which require that a percentage
of cargo bought with taxpayer dollars is shipped on U.S.-flag vessels to help meet our strategic goal of maintaining a U.S. Merchant Marine, often go unenforced, which means taxpayer financing of foreign maritime interests and less work for U.S. mariners.

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Last Call for Original Cosponsors: Housing Victims of Major Disasters Act

It has been over 6 months since Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico and many of our fellow United States Citizens are still struggling to obtain basic and livable housing. To address this desperate need, Congressman Adriano Espaillat and Congresswoman
Jenniffer González-Colón plan to introduce the Housing Victims of Major Disasters Act.

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Automation and its Impact on Workers of Color: Transportation and Autonomous Vehicles Roundtable – Tomorrow 2-4pm

A growing number of business leaders and experts are warning that emerging automation and artificial intelligence technologies will transform the future of work, disrupting labor markets, and possibly displacing large numbers of
workers. Some estimate tens of millions of jobs being lost in the U.S. and hundreds of millions worldwide.[1] One widely cited Oxford University study estimates that 47% of U.S. jobs are at risk for being automated by 2033.[2] It is expected that the hardest
hit by job losses are those who can least afford it. An Obama White House study found that, “the jobs that are threatened by automation are highly concentrated among lower-paid, lower-skilled, and less-educated workers.”[3] A study by the Joint Center for
Political & Economic Studies shows that workers of color are disproportionately at-risk, finding that, “Over 31 percent of Latino workers and 27 percent of African American workers are concentrated in just 30 occupations at high-risk to automation.”[4]

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Become an Original Cosponsor of the WATER Act of 2018!

Our water infrastructure is in a state of emergency. People in Flint, Michigan, still do not have access to safe drinking water. They are not alone. Families in communities across the country, from Detroit to Philadelphia to San Diego, have lost running
water or access to safe drinking water in their homes because they can not afford the increasing costs of water rates. We need a major federal investment in our public water infrastructure to renovate our nation’s old and lead-ridden water pipes, stop sewage
overflows and stem our water affordability crisis.

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Roundtable on Automation and its Impact on Workers of Color: Transportation and Autonomous Vehicles – Tomorrow April 11 2-4pm Cannon 234

A growing number of business leaders and experts are warning that emerging automation and artificial intelligence technologies will transform the future of work, disrupting labor markets, and possibly displacing large numbers of workers. Some estimate tens
of millions of jobs being lost in the U.S. and hundreds of millions worldwide.[1] One widely cited Oxford University study estimates that 47% of U.S. jobs are at risk for being automated by 2033.[2] It is expected that the hardest hit by job losses are those
who can least afford it. An Obama White House study found that, “the jobs that are threatened by automation are highly concentrated among lower-paid, lower-skilled, and less-educated workers.”[3] A study by the Joint Center for Political & Economic Studies
shows that workers of color are disproportionately at-risk, finding that, “Over 31 percent of Latino workers and 27 percent of African American workers are concentrated in just 30 occupations at high-risk to automation.”[4]

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Member Roundtable on Automation and its Impact on Workers of Color: Transportation and Autonomous Vehicles – Wednesday April 11 2-4pm Cannon 234

A growing number of business leaders and experts are warning that emerging automation and artificial intelligence technologies will transform the future of work, disrupting labor markets, and possibly displacing large numbers of
workers. Some estimate tens of millions of jobs being lost in the U.S. and hundreds of millions worldwide.[1] One widely cited Oxford University study estimates that 47% of U.S. jobs are at risk for being automated by 2033.[2] It is expected that the hardest
hit by job losses are those who can least afford it. An Obama White House study found that, “the jobs that are threatened by automation are highly concentrated among lower-paid, lower-skilled, and less-educated workers.”[3] A study by the Joint Center for
Political & Economic Studies shows that workers of color are disproportionately at-risk, finding that, “Over 31 percent of Latino workers and 27 percent of African American workers are concentrated in just 30 occupations at high-risk to automation.”[4]

Read More

Become an Original Cosponsor of the WATER Act of 2018!

Our water infrastructure is in a state of emergency. People in Flint, Michigan, still do not have access to safe drinking water. They are not alone. Families in communities across the country, from Detroit to Philadelphia to San Diego, have lost running
water or access to safe drinking water in their homes because they can not afford the increasing costs of water rates. We need a major federal investment in our public water infrastructure to renovate our nation’s old and lead-ridden water pipes, stop sewage
overflows and stem our water affordability crisis.

Read More

Member Roundtable on Automation and its Impact on Workers of Color: Transportation and Autonomous Vehicles – Wednesday April 11 2-4pm Cannon 234

A growing number of business leaders and experts are warning that emerging automation and artificial intelligence technologies will transform the future of work, disrupting labor markets, and possibly displacing large numbers of
workers. Some estimate tens of millions of jobs being lost in the U.S. and hundreds of millions worldwide.[1] One widely cited Oxford University study estimates that 47% of U.S. jobs are at risk for being automated by 2033.[2] It is expected that the hardest
hit by job losses are those who can least afford it. An Obama White House study found that, “the jobs that are threatened by automation are highly concentrated among lower-paid, lower-skilled, and less-educated workers.”[3] A study by the Joint Center for
Political & Economic Studies shows that workers of color are disproportionately at-risk, finding that, “Over 31 percent of Latino workers and 27 percent of African American workers are concentrated in just 30 occupations at high-risk to automation.”[4]

Read More

Become an Original Cosponsor of the WATER Act of 2018!

Our water infrastructure is in a state of emergency. People in Flint, Michigan, still do not have access to safe drinking water. They are not alone. Families in communities across the country, from Detroit to Philadelphia to San Diego, have lost running
water or access to safe drinking water in their homes because they can not afford the increasing costs of water rates. We need a major federal investment in our public water infrastructure to renovate our nation’s old and lead-ridden water pipes, stop sewage
overflows and stem our water affordability crisis.

Read More