Archives

Bring Back the Office of Technology Assessment!

May 8, 2018

We invite you to be an original cosponsor of H Res 849, a resolution expressing the sense of the House that the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) should be reestablished.

Lunch Briefing: Genetics in health and ancestry

May 8, 2018

Please join us for a briefing about what new advances in genetics can tell us about ancestry, health, and ourselves. The panel will focus on the role of genes and the environment in human health, the opportunities for precision medicine, and the role of
public engagement in the coming era of personal genetics and gene editing.

Great Lakes Week Resolution

May 8, 2018

Last week, I introduced the Great Lakes Week Resolution, designating the week of Memorial Day as “Great Lakes Week.” The Memorial Day weekend kicks off the Summer season in the Midwest, with families from across the country heading to the lake to
spend time together and enjoy some of nature’s great natural beauties, the Great Lakes, the surrounding forests and parks, and it’s amazing wildlife.    

Co-Sponsor Representative Posey’s Bill to Eliminate Death Gratuities

May 7, 2018

Sending Office: Posey, Bill Sent By: Johnathan.Sargent@mail.house.gov Current Cosponsors: Rep. Mike Coffman (R-CO), Rep. Todd Rokita (R-IN), Rep. Bradley Byrne (R-AL), and Rep. Barbara Comstock (R-VA) Dear Colleague,   As you know, the U.S. government pays a full year’s salary to the family of a member of Congress who dies serving while in office, a […]

Member Roundtable on Retail Automation and its Impact on Women and Workers of Color Tuesday May 8th 2:00-3:30pm Cannon 421

May 7, 2018

A growing number of business leaders and experts are warning that emerging automation and artificial intelligence technologies will transform the future of work, disrupting labor markets, and possibly displacing large numbers of
workers.  Some estimate tens of millions of jobs being lost in the U.S. and hundreds of millions worldwide.[1]  One widely cited Oxford University study estimates that 47% of U.S. jobs are at risk for being automated by 2033.[2]  The
hardest hit by the expected job losses are those who can least afford it.  An Obama White House study found that, “the jobs that are threatened by automation are highly concentrated among lower-paid, lower-skilled, and less-educated workers.”[3]
A study by the Joint Center for Political & Economic Studies shows that workers of color are disproportionately at-risk, finding that, “Over 31 percent of Latino workers and 27 percent of African American workers are concentrated in just 30 occupations at
high-risk to automation.”[4]

Become an Original Cosponsor of the AG RESEARCH Act

May 7, 2018

Agriculture plays a vital role in our economy. In 2015, agriculture and related industries contributed $992 billion to the U.S. gross domestic product (5.5 percent total GDP) and provided 21 million jobs (11 percent of total U.S. employment).  However,
when it comes to schools of agriculture, recent reports have shed light on the critical infrastructure needs all across the nation. One study, supported by the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) and published by Sightlines, LLC in October
2015 estimated that the deferred maintenance backlog at schools of agriculture totaled $8.4 billion. Each year USDA provides over $1.5 billion in research funding to schools of agriculture. Despite investing in agricultural research and development, federal
funds have not recently been made available for infrastructure needs. According to the Sightlines study, 80 percent of schools of agriculture are making infrastructure investments below what is required to stabilize or reduce the maintenance backlog.

Rural Caucus Briefing: Workforce Needs in Rural America

May 7, 2018

Across the nation, our districts are seeing the same trend: there is a high demand for workers to fill jobs in the middle of the labor market, especially those that require more than high-school, but less than a four-year degree [1].
Nothing has been truer for workers and employers in rural America, where roughly half (51-percent) of American workers hold middle-skill jobs[2].  A trained and skilled workforce is a valuable community
asset that has the potential to pull our rural areas out of crisis by making them more competitive for economic growth and development.

Tomorrow – Member Roundtable on Retail Automation and its Impact on Women and Workers of Color Tuesday May 8th 2:00-3:30pm Cannon 421

May 7, 2018

A growing number of business leaders and experts are warning that emerging automation and artificial intelligence technologies will transform the future of work, disrupting labor markets, and possibly displacing large numbers of
workers.  Some estimate tens of millions of jobs being lost in the U.S. and hundreds of millions worldwide.[1]  One widely cited Oxford University study estimates that 47% of U.S. jobs are at risk for being automated by 2033.[2]  The
hardest hit by the expected job losses are those who can least afford it.  An Obama White House study found that, “the jobs that are threatened by automation are highly concentrated among lower-paid, lower-skilled, and less-educated workers.”[3]
A study by the Joint Center for Political & Economic Studies shows that workers of color are disproportionately at-risk, finding that, “Over 31 percent of Latino workers and 27 percent of African American workers are concentrated in just 30 occupations at
high-risk to automation.”[4]

Lunch Briefing: Wearable Computing

May 7, 2018

Wearable computing includes “smart” glasses and “smart” watches. The technology in this space is moving forward rapidly and the new generation of “wearables” promises to go beyond, with federal funding playing an important role in driving this innovation.