Cosponsor the Security and Financial Empowerment (SAFE) Act to Support Workplace Protections for Domestic Violence Victims

One in four women and one in nine men have suffered physical violence at the hands of an intimate partner, which has a devastating impact on a survivor’s physical and emotional health. Often forgotten when we talk about victims of intimate partner violence,
sexual assault, stalking, and revenge pornography, is the severe economic impact this abuse can have on victims. It can cost victims their jobs, their homes, their health, and their insurance – and, in cases of domestic violence, reinforce their dependency
on their abusers as a result. Abusers often use economic necessities like rent, health care, and child care to exert control over their victims. And victims of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, stalking, and revenge pornography often find that abuse
and threats follow them from home into the workplace – each year, they lose nearly eight million days of paid work—the equivalent of more than 32,000 full-time jobs.

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October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Support Survivors by Cosponsoring the SAFE Act

One in four women and one in nine men have suffered physical violence at the hands of an intimate partner, which has a devastating impact on a survivor’s physical and emotional health. Often forgotten when we talk about victims of intimate partner violence,
sexual assault, stalking, and revenge pornography, is the severe economic impact this abuse can have on victims. It can cost victims their jobs, their homes, their health, and their insurance – and, in cases of domestic violence, reinforce their dependency
on their abusers as a result. Abusers often use economic necessities like rent, health care, and child care to exert control over their victims. And victims of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, stalking, and revenge pornography often find that abuse
and threats follow them from home into the workplace – each year, they lose nearly eight million days of paid work—the equivalent of more than 32,000 full-time jobs.

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Affirm Congress’s Support for Ending Hate and Violence

October 12, 2018 marks the 20th anniversary of the death of Matthew Shepard, who was targeted and brutally attacked because of his sexual orientation. His murder was a shock to our nation, and brought Americans’ attention to the discrimination and threats
that lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people face on a daily basis in our country.

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Join 116 Members in Defending Pre-Existing Condition Protections

Earlier this year, the Trump Administration announced it will no longer defend key parts of the ACA that
prevent insurance companies from charging more to cover pre-existing conditions or denying coverage altogether. Refusing to defend the existing law could take us back to the days when insurance companies could discriminate against people for everything from
battling cancer to being pregnant.

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October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Support Survivors by Cosponsoring the SAFE Act

One in four women and one in nine men have suffered physical violence at the hands of an intimate partner, which has a devastating impact on a survivor’s physical and emotional health. Often forgotten when we talk about victims of intimate partner violence,
sexual assault, stalking, and revenge pornography, is the severe economic impact this abuse can have on victims. It can cost victims their jobs, their homes, their health, and their insurance – and, in cases of domestic violence, reinforce their dependency
on their abusers as a result. Abusers often use economic necessities like rent, health care, and child care to exert control over their victims. And victims of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, stalking, and revenge pornography often find that abuse
and threats follow them from home into the workplace – each year, they lose nearly eight million days of paid work—the equivalent of more than 32,000 full-time jobs.

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Join 119 Members Calling for a Bipartisan Legislative Fix for TPS

There is increasing concern among immigrant communities throughout the United States about their future in this country. Among those living in fear are
people who are in receipt of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) or Deferred Enforced Departure (DED). Fear has grown exponentially given the way the Trump Administration has handled the TPS program. Since the President took office, his Administration has ended
TPS for Sudan; Nicaragua; Haiti; El
Salvador; Nepal and Honduras. The terminations affect 98%
of the total number of immigrants offered protections under TPS. The President has also decided to end the DED program
for Liberians.

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