Briefing TOMORROW: “Cybersecurity in Healthca What Cyber Attacks Mean for Hospitals, Doctors, and Patients”

Last year, the WannaCry ransomware attack paralyzed operations the U.K.’s National Health Service and left doctors to treat patients without access to medical records, medical procedures were cancelled, and some hospitals had to turn sick people away. Although
the incident garnered global attention, it is only one piece of a troubling trend: a rapid rise in cyberattacks targeting healthcare providers, public health agencies, and other medical community stakeholders. Hospitals across the country – from Hollywood
Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles to Hancock Regional Hospital in Indiana – have had their systems disrupted by cyberattacks, and hackers have set their sights on large health systems and community health centers alike. A recent survey from cybersecurity
firm Imperva found that 1 in 3 healthcare organizations have suffered a cyberattack, and 1 in 10 have paid a ransom in the past year. This trend accompanies growing concern about vulnerabilities in medical devices. 

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Briefing TODAY: “Cybersecurity in Healthca What Cyber Attacks Mean for Hospitals, Doctors, and Patients”

Last year, the WannaCry ransomware attack paralyzed operations the U.K.’s National Health Service and left doctors to treat patients without access to medical records, medical procedures were cancelled, and some hospitals had to turn sick people away. Although
the incident garnered global attention, it is only one piece of a troubling trend: a rapid rise in cyberattacks targeting healthcare providers, public health agencies, and other medical community stakeholders. Hospitals across the country – from Hollywood
Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles to Hancock Regional Hospital in Indiana – have had their systems disrupted by cyberattacks, and hackers have set their sights on large health systems and community health centers alike. A recent survey from cybersecurity
firm Imperva found that 1 in 3 healthcare organizations have suffered a cyberattack, and 1 in 10 have paid a ransom in the past year. This trend accompanies growing concern about vulnerabilities in medical devices. 

Read More

Support the bicameral COUNT Victims Act

On May 29, independent researchers from Harvard University released a report estimating the number of deaths caused by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico.[1] It uncovered a sobering figure of
4,654 lives that could have been lost as a result of the storm, many of them from delayed medical care. This is staggeringly higher than the official estimates. While much debate has ensued over the validity of the number, the truth is we may never know the
exact number of all lives lost. Amid a new hurricane season, we need to ensure transparency and oversight.

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Briefing STARTING SOON: “Cybersecurity in Healthca What Cyber Attacks Mean for Hospitals, Doctors, and Patients”

Last year, the WannaCry ransomware attack paralyzed operations the U.K.’s National Health Service and left doctors to treat patients without access to medical records, medical procedures were cancelled, and some hospitals had to turn sick people away. Although
the incident garnered global attention, it is only one piece of a troubling trend: a rapid rise in cyberattacks targeting healthcare providers, public health agencies, and other medical community stakeholders. Hospitals across the country – from Hollywood
Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles to Hancock Regional Hospital in Indiana – have had their systems disrupted by cyberattacks, and hackers have set their sights on large health systems and community health centers alike. A recent survey from cybersecurity
firm Imperva found that 1 in 3 healthcare organizations have suffered a cyberattack, and 1 in 10 have paid a ransom in the past year. This trend accompanies growing concern about vulnerabilities in medical devices. 

Read More

Briefing TUESDAY: “Cybersecurity in Healthca What Cyber Attacks Mean for Hospitals, Doctors, and Patients”

Last year, the WannaCry ransomware attack paralyzed operations the U.K.’s National Health Service and left doctors to treat patients without access to medical records, medical procedures were cancelled, and some hospitals had to turn sick people away. Although
the incident garnered global attention, it is only one piece of a troubling trend: a rapid rise in cyberattacks targeting healthcare providers, public health agencies, and other medical community stakeholders. Hospitals across the country – from Hollywood
Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles to Hancock Regional Hospital in Indiana – have had their systems disrupted by cyberattacks, and hackers have set their sights on large health systems and community health centers alike. A recent survey from cybersecurity
firm Imperva found that 1 in 3 healthcare organizations have suffered a cyberattack, and 1 in 10 have paid a ransom in the past year. This trend accompanies growing concern about vulnerabilities in medical devices. 

Read More

Co-sponsor the bicameral COUNT Victims Act

On May 29, a group of independent researchers from Harvard University released a report estimating the number of deaths caused by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico.[1] It uncovered a sobering
figure of 4,654 lives that could have been lost as a result of the storm, many of them from delayed medical care. This is staggeringly higher than the official estimates. While much debate has ensued over the validity of the number, the truth is we may never
know the exact number of all lives lost. Amid a new hurricane season, we need to ensure transparency and oversight.

Read More

Briefing TOMORROW: “Cybersecurity in Healthca What Cyber Attacks Mean for Hospitals, Doctors, and Patients”

Last year, the WannaCry ransomware attack paralyzed operations the U.K.’s National Health Service and left doctors to treat patients without access to medical records, medical procedures were cancelled, and some hospitals had to turn sick people away. Although
the incident garnered global attention, it is only one piece of a troubling trend: a rapid rise in cyberattacks targeting healthcare providers, public health agencies, and other medical community stakeholders. Hospitals across the country – from Hollywood
Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles to Hancock Regional Hospital in Indiana – have had their systems disrupted by cyberattacks, and hackers have set their sights on large health systems and community health centers alike. A recent survey from cybersecurity
firm Imperva found that 1 in 3 healthcare organizations have suffered a cyberattack, and 1 in 10 have paid a ransom in the past year. This trend accompanies growing concern about vulnerabilities in medical devices. 

Read More