Support CDC Funding for Climate + Health programs for FY19 — CLOSES THURS

Please join us in sending the attached letter to Chairman Cole and Ranking Member DeLauro encouraging the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies in support of continued funding for the Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Climate and Health Program for the Fiscal Year 2019.

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LAST CALL: No Taxpayer-Funded Retirement Benefits for Convicted Members of Congress

We hope you will join me in our letter to the Legislative Branch Appropriations Subcommittee urging the inclusion of language in the FY19 Legislative Branch Appropriations bill that prohibits public funds for the retirement benefits of a Member of Congress
who is convicted of a felony. If a soldier is dishonorably discharged, he loses his military benefits. Surely we should not hold Members of Congress to a lower standard. If you would like to sign this letter, please contact Mark Pieschel in Rep. Yoho’s office
at mark.pieschel@mail.house.gov or Grant Dubler in Rep. Rosen’s office at grant.dubler@mail.house.gov. Thank you for your consideration of this request.

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Support Full Funding for the Census Bureau

Please join us in requesting that the U.S. Census Bureau be funded at a level of at least $4.239 billion in fiscal year 2019. This amount is $438 million above the Administration’s FY2019 request of $3.801 billion for the Bureau and reflects the level stated
in the Department of Commerce’s revised FY19 cost estimate for the 2020 Census. The decennial census provides vital data for the nation and is used to apportion the seats of the U.S. House of Representatives, realign the boundaries of legislative districts
of each state, allocate billions of dollars in federal financial assistance, and provide social demographic, and economic data to guide policy decisions at each level of government. Adequate funding of the 2020 Census will help continue information technology
systems development and critical testing that will improve accuracy and reduce the lifecycle cost of the 2020 Census.

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Support FY19 Funding for Diversity Initiatives in the Dept of State

Please join me in sending the following letter to Chairman Rogers and Ranking Member Lowey from the Appropriations Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs to request funding of $5.4 million to improve these initiatives within the Department
of State, in line with the President’s budget request for FY2019.

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Cosponsor the Federal Retirement Fairness Act

Imagine working your whole career with the same people. You show up at the same time every day, you do the same work, for the same number of years, and when you find out it’s your time to retire, because of some government red tape applied 30 years prior,
you have to work five years longer than the rest of your colleagues. Unfortunately, many federal employees who should be reaching retirement are now finding themselves in this very position.
 
Over the years, the federal government has used temporary hiring authority to quickly increase the size of its workforce and adapt to fluctuating or short-term requirements in areas such as acquisition and ship maintenance. Many of these dedicated temporary
workers ultimately become permanent federal employees and contribute their life’s work to federal service.
 
Federal employees that began their career as temporary employees aren’t able to contribute the requisite number of years to draw full retirement benefits after 30 years of service. These dedicated workers then face a choice: leave the federal service without
full retirement benefits or work longer than their peers to obtain their full retirement benefits. In places like the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, where people work with their hands, this is a choice between two bad options. Retire without the security you
thought you had, or put your health at risk by working a few years longer than the rest of your peers in a physically-demanding job.
 
This has happened for as long as the modern federal service has existed. And, until 1989, federal employees who found themselves in this situation had the option buy back years of retirement contributions to allow for an “on-time” retirement. Unfortunately,
that authority expired, leaving folks with no option to obtain full retirement benefits for the amount of years they worked, other than continuing to work past their conventional retirement date. That is simply not fair.
 
This problem can be solved with minimal burden to the taxpayer. The Retirement Fairness Act would provide federal employees with the ability to retire on time. Specifically, it would allow interested and eligible employees to make additional contributions to
their retirement to compensate for the years they worked as temporary employees and did not pay into the federal retirement system. In order to minimize the burden on the taxpayer, the legislation would require payments to include a deposit of 1.3% percent
of the base pay for each year, corresponding interest, and the government’s contribution as calculated by the Director of the Office of Personnel Management.

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CLOSING TODAY COB: Restrict Public Retirement Funds to Members of Congress Convited of a Felony

We hope you will join us in our letter to the Legislative Branch Appropriations Subcommittee urging the inclusion of language in the FY19 Legislative Branch Appropriations bill that prohibits public funds for the retirement benefits of a Member of Congress
who is convicted of a felony. If a soldier is dishonorably discharged, he loses his military benefits. Surely we should not hold Members of Congress to a lower standard. If you would like to sign this letter, please contact Mark Pieschel in Rep. Yoho’s office
at mark.pieschel@mail.house.gov or Grant Dubler in Rep. Rosen’s office at grant.dubler@mail.house.gov. Thank you for your consideration of this request.

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