Cosponsor the Bipartisan Violence Against Women Health Act of 2018

Please join us in cosponsoring the bipartisan Violence Against Women Health Act. In 2005, Congress reauthorized the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) which included a new health title to develop a public health response to abuse by strengthening the health
care system’s identification, assessment and response of victims. To date, the VAWA Health program has trained more than 13,000 health care providers to assess for and respond to domestic and sexual violence in over 230 clinical settings serving more than
1.3 million patients. More patients are being screened, but more collaboration between health systems and advocates is needed to connect victims to services, help them escape the abuse, and improve their overall health and safety. 

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Protect Vulnerable Americans – Prevent Overuse of Antibiotic Medication in Nursing Homes

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest public health challenges of our time. Each year in the U.S., at least 2 million people get an antibiotic-resistant infection, and at least 23,000 people die.
Encouraging the appropriate use of antibiotics is critical to reduce adverse health effects, prevent the emergence of resistance, and optimize the effectiveness of treatments.  

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Cosponsor the Security and Financial Empowerment (SAFE) Act to Support Workplace Protections for Domestic Violence Victims

One in four women and one in nine men have suffered physical violence at the hands of an intimate partner, which has a devastating impact on a survivor’s physical and emotional health. Often forgotten when we talk about victims of intimate partner violence,
sexual assault, stalking, and revenge pornography, is the severe economic impact this abuse can have on victims. It can cost victims their jobs, their homes, their health, and their insurance – and, in cases of domestic violence, reinforce their dependency
on their abusers as a result. Abusers often use economic necessities like rent, health care, and child care to exert control over their victims. And victims of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, stalking, and revenge pornography often find that abuse
and threats follow them from home into the workplace – each year, they lose nearly eight million days of paid work—the equivalent of more than 32,000 full-time jobs.

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Cosponsor the Security and Financial Empowerment (SAFE) Act to Support Workplace Protections for Domestic Violence Victims

One in four women and one in nine men have suffered physical violence at the hands of an intimate partner, which has a devastating impact on a survivor’s physical and emotional health. Often forgotten when we talk about victims of intimate partner violence,
sexual assault, stalking, and revenge pornography, is the severe economic impact this abuse can have on victims. It can cost victims their jobs, their homes, their health, and their insurance – and, in cases of domestic violence, reinforce their dependency
on their abusers as a result. Abusers often use economic necessities like rent, health care, and child care to exert control over their victims. And victims of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, stalking, and revenge pornography often find that abuse
and threats follow them from home into the workplace – each year, they lose nearly eight million days of paid work—the equivalent of more than 32,000 full-time jobs.

Read More

Protect Vulnerable Americans – Prevent Overuse of Antibiotic Medication in Nursing Homes

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest public health challenges of our time. Each year in the U.S., at least 2 million people get an antibiotic-resistant infection, and at least 23,000 people die.
Encouraging the appropriate use of antibiotics is critical to reduce adverse health effects, prevent the emergence of resistance, and optimize the effectiveness of treatments.  

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Cosponsor the Correctional Public Health and Community Re Entry Act

Addiction is rampant in United States prisons and jails, with an estimated 65 percent meeting the clinical criteria for substance use disorder (SUD). The national opioid, heroin, and substance abuse crisis is not only an incredible strain on state and county
incarceration systems but it increasingly impacting people outside of the criminal justice system.

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Protect Vulnerable Americans – Prevent Overuse of Antibiotic Medication in Nursing Homes

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest public health challenges of our time. Each year in the U.S., at least 2 million people get an antibiotic-resistant infection, and at least 23,000 people die.
Encouraging the appropriate use of antibiotics is critical to reduce adverse health effects, prevent the emergence of resistance, and optimize the effectiveness of treatments.  

Read More

Cosponsor the Security and Financial Empowerment (SAFE) Act to Support Workplace Protections for Domestic Violence Victims

One in four women and one in nine men have suffered physical violence at the hands of an intimate partner, which has a devastating impact on a survivor’s physical and emotional health. Often forgotten when we talk about victims of intimate partner violence,
sexual assault, stalking, and revenge pornography, is the severe economic impact this abuse can have on victims. It can cost victims their jobs, their homes, their health, and their insurance – and, in cases of domestic violence, reinforce their dependency
on their abusers as a result. Abusers often use economic necessities like rent, health care, and child care to exert control over their victims. And victims of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, stalking, and revenge pornography often find that abuse
and threats follow them from home into the workplace – each year, they lose nearly eight million days of paid work—the equivalent of more than 32,000 full-time jobs.

Read More