Co-Sponsor Representative Posey’s Article I Restoration Act

Sending Office: Posey, Bill Sent By: Johnathan.Sargent@mail.house.gov         Request for Cosponsor(s) Dear Colleague,   Every day we hear from employers large and small how regulations from Washington make it harder for them to do business. Over the past several years unelected bureaucrats have imposed burdensome regulations on the American people at a […]

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COSPONSOR House Resolution 128–Supporting Respect for Human Rights and Encouraging Inclusive Governance in Ethiopia

With an upcoming vote in early April, we are calling on you to cosponsor House Resolution 128 (H.Res.128), “Supporting Respect for Human Rights and Encouraging Inclusive Governance in Ethiopia.”  It calls on the Government of Ethiopia to take clear,
decisive steps toward becoming more inclusive, more democratic, and more respectful of the basic human rights of its citizens.  Congress must speak out in defense of democracy, civil liberties, and personal freedoms that we hold dear.

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Co-Sponsor Representative Posey’s Bill to Eliminate Death Gratuities

Sending Office: Posey, Bill Sent By: Johnathan.Sargent@mail.house.gov         Request for Cosponsor(s) Dear Colleague,   As you know, the U.S. government pays a full year’s salary to the family of a member of Congress who dies serving while in office, a death gratuity created decades ago that was intended to serve as a […]

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Co-Sponsor Representative Posey’s Article I Restoration Act

Sending Office: Posey, Bill Sent By: Johnathan.Sargent@mail.house.gov         Request for Cosponsor(s) Dear Colleague,   Every day we hear from employers large and small how regulations from Washington make it harder for them to do business. Over the past several years unelected bureaucrats have imposed burdensome regulations on the American people at a […]

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COSPONSOR: Upholding the Integrity of Public Officials Act (H.R. 4218)

The Upholding the Integrity of Public Officials Act (H.R. 4218) updates existing anti-bribery and corruption laws to clarify that an “official act” is any action taken or to be taken under color of official authority by a public official or person who has
been selected to be a public official. This legislation is necessary after the Supreme Court’s 2016 ruling in McDonnell v. United States, which defined “official act” so narrowly that it now excludes a range of behaviors and actions that clearly violate the
public’s trust.

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The No Pensions for Corrupt Politicians Act (H.R. 4314)

In 2007, the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act (P.L. 110-81) was passed on a bipartisan basis and signed into law by President George W. Bush. This important ethics reform law bars public officials who are convicted of bribery, perjury, conspiracy
or other related crimes from collecting their taxpayer-funded pensions.
However, as recent convictions have demonstrated, members have found a loophole that allows them to continue to receive their pensions even following a conviction. This loophole is the result of ambiguity in existing law, which requires pensions to be forfeited
only when a former member of Congress has exhausted their appeals in full. This means that even after a lawful conviction for corruption, members can go on to receive their taxpayer-funded pensions for years by filing one appeal after another.
The No Pensions for Corrupt Politicians Act of 2017 (H.R. 4314) would close this loophole. It would update current law to immediately halt any federal pension payment to a former member of Congress following a lawful conviction. If their conviction is overturned
on appeal, the member would continue to receive their pension as normal and would also be eligible to receive any retroactive payments for which they would have been eligible.
Former members of Congress who are convicted of corruption should not receive their taxpayer-funded pensions as they drag out the appeals process. This commonsense legislation would rightly prohibit former members from receiving their pension payments after
a conviction, reinstating such payments only in the case of a successful appeal. To learn more about this bill or to be added as a cosponsor, please contact Robert Simpson (robert.simpson@mail.house.gov).

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Co-Sponsor Representative Posey’s Bill to Eliminate Death Gratuities

Sending Office: Posey, Bill Sent By: Johnathan.Sargent@mail.house.gov         Request for Cosponsor(s) Dear Colleague,   As you know, the U.S. government pays a full year’s salary to the family of a member of Congress who dies serving while in office, a death gratuity created decades ago that was intended to serve as a […]

Read More

No Pensions for Corrupt Politicians (H.R. 4314)

In 2007, the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act (P.L. 110-81) was passed on a bipartisan basis and signed into law by President George W. Bush. This important ethics reform law bars public officials who are convicted of bribery, perjury, conspiracy
or other related crimes from collecting their taxpayer-funded pensions.
However, as recent convictions have demonstrated, members have found a loophole that allows them to continue to receive their pensions even following a conviction. This loophole is the result of ambiguity in existing law, which requires pensions to be forfeited
only when a former member of Congress has exhausted their appeals in full. This means that even after a lawful conviction for corruption, members can go on to receive their taxpayer-funded pensions for years by filing one appeal after another.
The No Pensions for Corrupt Politicians Act of 2017 (H.R. 4314) would close this loophole. It would update current law to immediately halt any federal pension payment to a former member of Congress following a lawful conviction. If their conviction is overturned
on appeal, the member would continue to receive their pension as normal and would also be eligible to receive any retroactive payments for which they would have been eligible.
Former members of Congress who are convicted of corruption should not receive their taxpayer-funded pensions as they drag out the appeals process. This commonsense legislation would rightly prohibit former members from receiving their pension payments after
a conviction, reinstating such payments only in the case of a successful appeal. To learn more about this bill or to be added as a cosponsor, please contact Robert Simpson (robert.simpson@mail.house.gov).

Read More