ICYMI: Pentagon starting first-ever financial audit

I write to draw your attention to a recent Hill article entitled
Pentagon starting first-ever financial audit. The long overdue announcement by the Pentagon that they will undertake a financial audit is an important step towards transparency. As you might know, the Pentagon has lost tens of billions of dollars
to duplication of programs and inefficiency. It is past time to check those practices that ultimately weaken our national security.

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Protect the Ability to Save Taxpayer’s Money via Advance Refunding and; Infrastructure, Housing, and Educational Financing Uses of Private Activity Bonds

I write to draw your attention to a relatively obscure provision in the tax code with enormous implications for infrastructure and public finance.  Tax reform season is upon us, and many of us
would like to see a comprehensive bipartisan bill put forth that addresses the wrenching complexity, unfairness, and inefficiency of the current tax code.  Yet we face the prospect of changes that would prohibit some types of tax-exempt state and local government
bonds and needlessly hamstring others. This could have unintended consequences for infrastructure repair and development for broad swaths of the nonprofit community and municipal finance world. 

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H. Con. Res. 8, The Fiscal State of the Nation Resolution

We invite you to become a co-sponsor of the Fiscal State of the Nation Resolution. This resolution will provide Members of Congress and the American people an annual update on the long-term financial health of the country. The Budget Committee has
included our resolution in their plan for budget process reform plan.

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Sign-on letter: Don’t tax graduate students’ tuition waivers!

As you’re probably aware, H.R. 1, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act contains a provision that would make graduate students’ tuition waivers taxable income (Sec. 1204). These tuition waivers are money the students never see, they represent tuition forgiveness the
students receive in exchange for working as teaching or research assistants. The actual monetary stipends these students receive are very low (55% of graduate students nationwide have an adjusted gross income of $20,000 or less), and most cannot afford a big
increase in their tax bill.

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