SUPPORT H.R. 2936, The Resilient Federal Forest Act of 2017

The Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017, introduced by Representative Bruce Westerman (R-AR), is a bipartisan solution to address the growing economic and environmental threats of catastrophic wildfire. This legislation pairs a responsible fire
borrowing solution with targeted forest management reforms to dramatically improve the health and resiliency of our nation’s forests and rangelands.

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Oppose H.R. 2936: Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017

H.R. 2936, the so-called Resilient Federal Forests Act introduced by Representative Westerman (R-AR), claims to promote forest health and reduce wildfire risk on public lands by providing broad exemptions from environmental analysis, restricting judicial
review of certain forest management activities, and scaling back wildlife conservation efforts. The bill is a sweeping attack on responsible forest management policy that upends keystone environmental safeguards, limits public participation in land management
decisions, and prioritizes commercial timber harvest over transparent, science-based management.

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LAST CALL! – Support Transparency in Rule-Making

Ralph Norman                                                             Paul A. Gosar, D.D.S.
Member of Congress                                                   Member of Congress

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Republican Forest Bill Fails to Fix the Wildfire Budget

In recent years, firefighting costs have consumed over fifty percent of the Forest Service’s budget, with the largest one percent of wildfires accounting for thirty percent of those costs. The costs of large, complex wildfires force the Forest Service to
transfer funds away from programs that promote forest health and mitigate wildfire risk in order to fund wildfire suppression. This counterintuitive practice, commonly known as “fire borrowing,” will continue to divert huge sums of money from forest management
activities until Congress provides a solution.

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Republican Forest Bill Fails to Fix the Wildfire Budget

In recent years, firefighting costs have consumed over fifty percent of the Forest Service’s budget, with the largest one percent of wildfires accounting for thirty percent of those costs. The costs of large, complex wildfires force the Forest Service to
transfer funds away from programs that promote forest health and mitigate wildfire risk in order to fund wildfire suppression. This counterintuitive practice, commonly known as “fire borrowing,” will continue to divert huge sums of money from forest management
activities until Congress provides a solution.

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