July Humanities Recess Event: Hamilton Exhibit at the National Postal Museum

Please join the Congressional Humanities Caucus for the July Humanities Recess Event (HRE)
next Friday, July 20, at 11:00 am at the National Postal Museum for the limited-time exhibit,
Alexander Hamilton: Soldier, Secretary, Icon. HREs are monthly Caucus-sponsored events for staffers to develop understandings of the relationships of public policy to history, literature, languages, philosophy, ethics, religion,
anthropology, government, linguistics, and other humanities disciplines.

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Caregiving Movie Screening: CARE

By 2030, there will be more than 72 million older Americans over the age of 65, making up 19% of the total population. As they age, many of these seniors will require long-term supports and services, placing a huge burden on a fragmented system that is already
struggling to provide and finance care for seniors, veterans, and individuals with disabilities. Studies have shown that most Americans in need of these services prefer to receive care in the home, but we face a shortage of professional caregivers, and family
caregivers cannot do it alone.

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Stand with NATO Allies Against Russian Power Plays

In advance of the upcoming summit between President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin, I invite you to join me as a cosponsor on the Countering Russian Power Plays Act, new legislation to impose sanctions on the people and companies working on Russia’s
controversial Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline.

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Become an Original Cosponsor of the AG RESEARCH Act

Agriculture plays a vital role in our economy. In 2015, agriculture and related industries contributed $992 billion to the U.S. gross domestic product (5.5 percent total GDP) and provided 21 million jobs (11 percent of total U.S. employment).  However, when
it comes to schools of agriculture, recent reports have shed light on the critical infrastructure needs all across the nation. One study, supported by the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) and published by Sightlines, LLC in October
2015 estimated that the deferred maintenance backlog at schools of agriculture totaled $8.4 billion. Each year USDA provides over $1.5 billion in research funding to schools of agriculture. Despite investing in agricultural research and development, federal
funds have not recently been made available for infrastructure needs. According to the Sightlines study, 80 percent of schools of agriculture are making infrastructure investments below what is required to stabilize or reduce the maintenance backlog.
The AG RESEARCH Act deals with the problem of the deferred maintenance backlog in two ways. The bill establishes within the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) a 1- to-1 matching competitive grant to schools of agriculture for altering, modernizing,
renovating, or remodeling research facilities and equipment-with priority given to projects that are shovel-ready or incorporate renewable energy or energy/water-efficient technologies.
The bill also authorizes the use of Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) funds for maintenance of ARS research facilities-with priority given to the most critical projects as indicated in the ARS Capital Investment Strategy.
Join us in helping to improve the infrastructure of our schools of agriculture to insure that research done for one of the pivotal pillars of our economy remains viable, cutting-edge, and helpful. If you would like to join as a cosponsor or for more information,
please contact Dave Chun at Dave.Chun@mail.house.gov.
 

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Briefing TUESDAY: “Cybersecurity in Healthca What Cyber Attacks Mean for Hospitals, Doctors, and Patients”

Last year, the WannaCry ransomware attack paralyzed operations the U.K.’s National Health Service and left doctors to treat patients without access to medical records, medical procedures were cancelled, and some hospitals had to turn sick people away. Although
the incident garnered global attention, it is only one piece of a troubling trend: a rapid rise in cyberattacks targeting healthcare providers, public health agencies, and other medical community stakeholders. Hospitals across the country – from Hollywood
Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles to Hancock Regional Hospital in Indiana – have had their systems disrupted by cyberattacks, and hackers have set their sights on large health systems and community health centers alike. A recent survey from cybersecurity
firm Imperva found that 1 in 3 healthcare organizations have suffered a cyberattack, and 1 in 10 have paid a ransom in the past year. This trend accompanies growing concern about vulnerabilities in medical devices. 

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