Cosponsor the Bipartisan Anti-Lunch Shaming Act (H.R. 2401)

According to a 2014 report by the USDA, nearly half of all school districts used some form of lunch shaming in order to compel parents to pay for school meals. Often, students’ hot lunches are taken away and replaced with an alternative meal, like a cold
cheese sandwich. A recent New York Times article shed light on some of the troubling practices. An elementary school in Utah threw away
the lunches of about 40 students with unpaid food bills and in Alabama a child received a stamp on the arm with the words, “I Need Lunch Money.”

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Co-sponsor H.R. 4714, a bill to award Mercy Ships founders the Congressional Gold Medal

Don and Deyon Stephens are celebrating 40 years leading the humanitarian relief organization Mercy Ships, whose
large hospital ships have reached over 70 countries and have directly benefitted over 2.5 million people. Given the inspiring and invaluable work that Mercy Ships has done over the years — and continues to do today — their tenure is one that is truly worth
celebrating. In recognition of their dedication to Mercy Ships, I am inviting you to cosponsor H.R. 4714, a bill to award Mr. and Mrs. Stephens a Congressional Gold Medal.

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SEPT 13 Lunch Briefing: Privacy & Current Issues in the Consumer Genetics Industry

I wanted to bring your attention to a lunch briefing invitation you should have already received entitled
Privacy & Current Issues in the Consumer Genetics Industry. The briefing will be held
Thursday, September 13th at 12:00 PM in 421 Cannon and will feature Kate Black, Global Privacy Officer & Senior Counsel at 23andMe, who will describe 23andMe’s experience
in consumer genetics, as well discuss the privacy practices and general privacy principles that all consumer facing companies should adopt. Additional details below:

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Support Food Banks: Cosponsor the Bipartisan Food Bank Assistance Act (H.R. 4020)

Since 2008, the Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP) Storage and Distribution Funds have been authorized at $100 million, but each year only about $50 million has been appropriated. TEFAP is a means-tested federal program that provides food commodities
to low-income Americans in need of short-term hunger relief through organizations like food banks, pantries, soup kitchens, and emergency shelters.  This funding level covers only about 25% of what food banks actually spend on storing and distributing food. 
To make up the other 75% of costs, food banks have to divert private donations to support the cost of storing and distributing TEFAP foods instead of using that money to improve programs and services for individuals in need, or to purchase more fresh, locally
grown foods for the program. 

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Independent study by GWU confirms Hurricane Maria death toll of 2,975 – cosponsor the COUNT Victims Act

On August 28, 2018, the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health published an

independent analysis commissioned by the Governor of Puerto Rico showing that Hurricane Maria killed an estimated 2,975 people in Puerto Rico from September 2017 through February 2018. Notably, the study found those in low-income areas and elderly men were
at the greatest risk of dying. This comes mere weeks after the government of Puerto Rico finally

acknowledged the official death toll of 64, upon which it relied for months, was a gross undercount, and that the true number was likely to be in the thousands. Though we may never know the exact number of all lives lost during and as a result of Hurricane
Maria, the fact that numerous independent studies (e.g., by the
New York Times and
Harvard University) show the true number is likely to be in the thousands underscores the need for nationwide best practices guidance for quantifying mortality post-natural disaster. More importantly, it shows how badly transparency and oversight are needed
when it comes to post-disaster death counts.

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CLOSING COB TODAY – Protect Lawful Asylum – Join Letter to Attorney General Sessions

America’s asylum laws and protections are being shredded due to a series of actions taken by U.S. Attorney General Sessions and directives issued by the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security. Key among these is the June 11th decision taken
by Attorney General Sessions that gang-related, domestic and gender-based violence are no longer eligible grounds for seeking asylum. In the latter two, this required the Attorney General to vacate the Board of Immigration Appeals decision in the
Matter of A-B- and overturn the Matter of A-R-C-G, which significantly limits the ability of survivors of domestic violence to gain asylum. Over a decade of U.S. case law and precedent have upheld domestic violence as grounds for seeking asylum.
Further, it is self-defeating to pretend that, amidst the humanitarian crisis in the Northern Triangle of Central America, individual asylum claims by those fleeing the region that involve domestic violence, gang violence, or other acute harm by state and
non-state actors cannot constitute a basis for a credible fear of persecution.

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STRENGTHEN FARA in advance of Manafort trial

The Wall Street Journal reported that seven Senate Democrats asked the Department of Justice to determine whether President Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani violated the Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA). Last month and in contradiction to the U.S. State
Department’s position, Giuliani was paid by Freeh Group International Solutions to lobby the president of Romania, criticizing the country’s anti-corruption investigations.

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