DearColleague.us

Letter

Sending Office: Honorable Yvette D. Clarke
Sent By:
Christopher.Cox@mail.house.gov

        Request for Signature(s)

Support LHHS Letters on Brain Aneurysm Research and Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness

CLOSING THURSDAY, MARCH 12TH COB

FOLLOW THIS LINK TO ADD YOUR BOSS

Dear Colleague:

Please join us in urging the House Appropriations Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Subcommittee to support funding for the following issues:

Brain Aneurysm Research

An estimated six million people in the United States, or 1 in 50 Americans have an unruptured brain aneurysm. Each year, approximately 30,000 Americans will suffer a brain aneurysm rupture, resulting in hundreds of millions of dollars in health expenses
and lost wages. It also creates a need for support services for survivors with permanent disabilities.

Despite the widespread prevalence of this condition and the significant societal cost it imposes on the nation, the Federal government currently spends $2.08 on research for each person suffering from brain aneurysms. We are requesting that the Subcommittee
support the inclusion of the following language in the report accompanying the Fiscal Year 2021 Appropriations bill:

Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Brain Aneurysm Research — The Committee continues to be concerned that an estimated 1 out of 50 individuals in the United States has a brain aneurysm, and an estimated 30,000 Americans suffer from a brain aneurysm rupture
each year. The Committee is concerned that not enough research is focused on prevention of brain aneurysm ruptures. Of the funding amount, the Committee requests that $25 million be used for research on preventing brain aneurysm ruptures.

We appreciate your consideration of our request and your ongoing leadership and commitment to research.
To sign on, please complete the form at this
link
.

Please contact Christopher Cox (5-6231) at Christopher.Cox@mail.house.gov if you have any additional questions.

Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness and Research

Please join us in writing the House Appropriations Committee to express your support for the public awareness initiative to bring attention to kidney disease. Approximately 37 million people in the United States have chronic kidney disease with 90 percent
not being diagnosed.

We are requesting the following language in the report accompanying the Fiscal Year 2021 appropriations bill to improve patient outcomes and help reduce Medicare expenditures.

The Committee is deeply troubled by the significant and growing burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD), which affects an estimated 37 million Americans. Unfortunately, 90 percent of individuals with CKD are unaware they have
the illness, only learning of it when their kidneys have already failed.  This trend must be reversed.  With timely awareness, diagnosis, and treatment, we can slow the progression of kidney disease and its comorbidities.

The Committee provides $10 million for the CDC to administer a public awareness initiative, building on the Administration’s July 2019 Advancing American Kidney Health Initiative, that provides education about kidney disease
to providers and at-risk Americans and promotes early detection, treatment and management of kidney disease to improve patient outcomes.  This approach would utilize a competitive grant process to support national, public-private partnerships that enhance
awareness of kidney disease.

We appreciate your consideration of our request and your ongoing leadership and commitment to research. To sign on, please complete the form at this
link.

Please contact Christopher Cox (5-6231) at
Christopher.Cox@mail.house.gov
if you have any additional questions.

Sincerely,

 

Yvette D. Clarke                                                                              

Member of Congress 

—–

Brain Aneurysm Research

Dear Chairwoman DeLauro and Ranking Member Cole:

We write to you with concern for the estimated six million people in the United States, or 1 in 50 Americans, who have an unruptured brain aneurysm. Each year, approximately 30,000 Americans suffer from brain aneurysm ruptures, at a cost of hundreds of millions
of dollars in health care expenses, lost wages and support services for survivors with permanent disabilities.

Despite the widespread prevalence of this condition and the significant societal cost it imposes on the nation, brain aneurysm advocates and patients are concerned about the relatively low funding levels for brain aneurysm research. Currently, the federal
government spends just $2.08 on research for each person afflicted, a fraction of what is spent on other diseases and conditions that affect far fewer people. We respectfully request that the Subcommittee includes the following language in the report accompanying
the Fiscal Year 2021 appropriations bill.

Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Brain Aneurysm Research.— The Committee continues to be concerned that an estimated 1 out of 50 individuals in the United States has a brain aneurysm, and an estimated 30,000 Americans suffer from a brain aneurysm rupture
each year. The Committee is concerned that not enough research is focused on prevention of brain aneurysm ruptures. Of the funding amount, the Committee requests that $25 million be used for research on preventing brain aneurysm ruptures.

Brain aneurysms are treatable and technological advancements continue to evolve and improve treatment options. The key is to treat brain aneurysms before they rupture, and the need for heightened awareness and research on early detection and treatment methods
are essential. Approximately 38 neurosurgeons at hospitals across the country agree and support this request.

We appreciate your consideration of our request and your ongoing leadership and commitment to medical research.

Sincerely,

Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness and Research

Dear Chairwoman DeLauro and Ranking Member Cole:

My colleagues and I write to raise concern for the 37 million American adults who have chronic kidney disease (CKD).  In addition, 80 million Americans are at risk for developing kidney disease. CKD is a disease multiplier that increases the risk of emergency
department visits, hospitalizations, cardiovascular events, kidney failure and death. The Medicare program spends approximately $120 billion – more than 34 percent of total spending – on patients with kidney disease.  End Stage Renal Disease, which requires
patients to undergo either dialysis or a kidney transplant affects only 1 percent of Medicare beneficiaries, but accounts for 7 percent of Medicare spending.

Unfortunately, 90 percent of individuals with kidney disease have not been officially diagnosed. In fact, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services estimates that up to 35 percent of patients do not receive any nephrology care before beginning dialysis. 
In other words, many patients don’t learn they have kidney disease until their kidneys have already failed.

Recent studies, including a collaboration between the National Kidney Foundation and CareFirst BlueCross/BlueShield, have shown that early intervention and treatment can reduce hospitalizations, readmissions and
can slow or even stop the progression of the disease to the life-threatening end stages. For these interventions to work, however, patients need to be aware of their risk for kidney disease and have access to clinical professionals who can help them
manage their conditions.

Last year, the Advancing America’s Kidney Health Initiative called for the development of a public awareness initiative to enhance awareness of kidney disease, educate clinical professionals and spur innovation by entities serving the kidney community.

Reaching all at-risk Americans, however, will require a broadscale and sustained effort.  We respectfully request the Subcommittee to support the following language in the report accompanying the Fiscal Year 2021 appropriations bill to improve patient outcomes
and help reduce Medicare expenditures.

The Committee is deeply troubled by the significant and growing burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD), which affects an estimated 37 million Americans. Unfortunately, 90 percent of individuals with CKD are unaware they have
the illness, only learning of it when their kidneys have already failed.  This trend must be reversed.  With timely awareness, diagnosis, and treatment, we can slow the progression of kidney disease and its comorbidities.

The Committee provides $10 million for the CDC to administer a public awareness initiative, building on the Administration’s July 2019 Advancing American Kidney Health Initiative, that provides education about kidney disease
to providers and at-risk Americans and promotes early detection, treatment and management of kidney disease to improve patient outcomes.  This approach would utilize a competitive grant process to support national, public-private partnerships that enhance
awareness of kidney disease.

We appreciate your consideration of our request and your ongoing leadership and commitment to providing Americans with adequate, educational information that will protect their health.

Sincerely,

                                            

Related Legislative Issues

Selected legislative information:Appropriations, HealthCare

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