DearColleague.us

Letter

Brian Higgins

From the office of:

Brian Higgins

Sending Office: Honorable Brian Higgins
Sent By:
Jessica.Burnell@mail.house.gov

Support Increased Funding for the National Cancer Institute

Sign-On Deadline is COB Monday, March 9th

FY21 Signers (86): Suozzi, Peter, Jackson Lee, Moore, Payne, Carson, Sires, Hastings, DeSaulnier, Engel, Deutch, Sanchez, Cohen, Casten, Kim, Scanlon, Foster, Hayes, Bustos, Blunt Rochester, Smith (NJ), Sablan, Delgado, Vela, Morelle,
Gallego, Houlahan, Davis (Danny), Green, DeFazio, Nadler, Axne, Velazquez, Meeks, Levin, Barragan, McEachin, Espaillat, Gonzalez, Rush, Norton, Richmond, Welch, Cunningham, Wexton, Pressley, Bernice Johnson, McAdams, Peters, Posey, Kuster, Haaland, Omar, Connolly,
Gabbard, Schrier, Moulton, Trone, Khanna, Allred, Murphy, Boyle, Schneider, Doyle, Katko, Lee, Lamb, Thompson (MS), Porter, Soto, Lofgren, Horn, Davids, Plaskett, Mucarsel-Powell, Spanberger, Pappas, Clarke (NY), Jayapal, Eshoo, Wilson, Himes, Yoho, Cardenas,
Rose, Maloney (Carolyn)

FY20 Signers (92): Moulton, Wasserman Schultz, Nadler, Cicilline, Rush, Green, Vela, Hastings, Jackson Lee, Gottheimer, Garcia (IL), Khanna, Himes, Delgado, Foster, Maloney (NY), Allred, Thompson (MS), Haaland, Katko, Soto, Larson, Lee,
Velázquez, Ocasio-Cortez, Gabbard, Espaillat, Boyle, Mooney, Schrier, Wilson, Clarke, Hayes, Casten, Wexton, Cohen, Welch, Ruppersberger, Shalala, Pappas, Plaskett, Davis (Danny), Van Drew, DeSaulnier, McAdams, Sires, Cárdenas, Sablan, Scott (GA), Raskin,
Kim, Moore, Rose, Payne, Omar, Engel, Levin, Doyle, Spanberger, McBath, Norton, Murphy, Eddie Bernice Johnson, Davids, Finkenauer, Pressley, Blunt Rochester, Clay, Morelle, Grothman, Lamb, McCall, Sewell, Carson, Deutch, Luria, Yarmuth, Schneider, Gaetz, Neguse,
Cleaver, Houlahan, Lipinski, Slotkin, McEachin, Mucarsel-Powell, Trone, Bustos, Scanlon

Dear Colleague-

Please join us in supporting increased funding for the National Cancer Institute for FY2021.

Cancer is a relentless disease that impacts millions of Americans. Just this year more than 1.7 million people in the US are expected to be diagnosed with cancer, and over 600,000 Americans will die from the disease. Cancer not only impacts individuals and
families across the country, but it also costs our economy more than $216 billion annually in direct treatment costs and lost productivity.

But there is hope. Because of the previous congressional investment in cancer research, more than 15.5 million American cancer survivors are alive today, and we are enjoying a quarter century of sustained declines in cancer mortality. As of 2017, the cancer
death rate for men and women combined has fallen 29 percent from its peak in 1991. This decline represents roughly 2.9 million deaths avoided between 1991 and 2017. Between 2016 and 2017, cancer death rates in America fell 2.2 percent – the largest single-year
drop ever.

But we cannot become complacent in the light of this good news. To continue the progress that has led to medical breakthroughs for treatment and therapies for millions of cancer patients, the NCI needs an increased, sustainable federal investment. Therefore,
we are asking that at least $6.928 billion in overall funding be included in the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education appropriations bill for the National Cancer Institute in Fiscal Year 2021.

If you have questions, or wish to sign onto the letter in support of this critical funding for life-saving research, please contact Jessica Burnell (Jessica.Burnell@mail.house.gov) in Rep. Higgins’s office.
The deadline to sign on is COB Monday, March 9th, 2020.

Sincerely,

Brian Higgins                                                            Peter T. King

Member of Congress                                                 Member of Congress

Brian Fitzpatrick                                                        

Member of Congress

——————————————————————————————————————————–

March 13, 2020

The Honorable Rosa DeLauro

Chairwoman

Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Related Agencies

Committee on Appropriations

U.S. House of Representatives

Washington, DC 20515

 

The Honorable Tom Cole

Ranking Member

Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Related Agencies

Committee on Appropriations

U.S. House of Representatives

Washington, DC 20515

 

Dear Chairwoman DeLauro and Ranking Member Cole,

As you prepare the Fiscal Year 2021 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies appropriations bill, we write to express our support for increased funding for the National Cancer Institute (NCI). 

Cancer is a relentless disease that impacts millions of Americans. Just this year more than 1.7 million people in the US are expected to be diagnosed with cancer, and over 600,000 Americans will die from the disease. Cancer not only impacts individuals and
families across the country, but it also costs our economy more than $216 billion annually in direct treatment costs and lost productivity.

But there is hope. Because of the previous congressional investment in cancer research, more than 15.5 million American cancer survivors are alive today, and we are enjoying a quarter century of sustained declines in cancer mortality. As of 2017, the cancer
death rate for men and women combined has fallen 29 percent from its peak in 1991. This decline represents roughly 2.9 million deaths avoided between 1991 and 2017. Between 2016 and 2017, cancer death rates in America fell 2.2 percent – the largest single-year
drop ever.

Thanks to bipartisan, bicameral support, medical research at the NIH and cancer research at NCI are back on the path of promise and discovery. However, the NCI is experiencing a demand for research funding that is far beyond that of any other Institute or
Center (IC).  Between FY 2013 and FY 2018, the number of R01 (investigator-initiated) grant applications to NCI rose by 45.9 percent. For all other ICs during that time, the number of R01 applications rose by just 4.9 percent. 

As a result of this extraordinary demand from the scientific community, the success rate for grant applications at NCI dropped from 13.7 percent in FY 2013 to 11.3 percent in FY 2018. This is a situation unique to NCI, at a time when cancer researchers are
making historic advances in new treatments and therapies. The success rate for NIH overall during that same period actually rose from 16.8 percent to 20.2 percent.

Recognizing this situation, Congress acted by dedicating new funding in FY 2020 to address this precipitous decline in the success rate for research project grant (RPG) applications at NCI. To continue the progress that has led to medical breakthroughs for
treatment and therapies for millions of cancer patients, the NCI needs an increased, sustainable federal investment. Therefore, Congress should provide at least $6.928 billion in overall funding for the National Cancer Institute in Fiscal Year 2020.

Thank you for your consideration of our request to provide critical funding for this life-saving research.

Sincerely,

Brian Higgins

Member of Congress

 

Peter T. King

Member of Congress

 

Brian Fitzpatrick

Member of Congress

Related Legislative Issues

Selected legislative information: Appropriations, HealthCare

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