Sending Office: Honorable G. K. Butterfield
Sent By:
Dennis.Sills@mail.house.gov

Support funding for the National Science Foundation (NSF) in Fiscal Year (FY) 2020

This is a programmatic request

Submission instructions will be provided

 

Supported by: Coalition for National Science Funding (CNSF)

 

DEADLINE: Monday, March 25, 2019 at 1 p.m.

To sign on, please complete
THIS FORM

Dear Colleague:

We urge you to join us in sending the attached letter to the Chairman and Ranking Member of the Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee to request that the National Science Foundation (NSF) receive at least $9 billion
in funding for Fiscal Year (FY) 2020.

Millions of American lives are improved by the research and inventions made possible from the NSF.  We are all kept safer through advanced chemical and weapons screening technology.  At the workplace we have benefitted from the ability to communicate with
clients and businesses using high-definition video conferencing.  At home we are able to enjoy low-cost, renewable energy through solar technology.  Abroad, our military has been protected through advanced radar technology and biological weapons sensors. 
Businesses are made safer through new cybersecurity technologies and strategies.  NSF research funding makes those types of breakthroughs possible because the NSF is the only federal agency that supports essential education and research across all science
and engineering fields.         

Investing in the NSF is critical to our nation remaining competitive in the global economy. According to the National Science Board’s (NSB) 2018 Science and Engineering Indicators report, “the number of jobs in the United States requiring substantial science,
technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) expertise has grown nearly 34% over the past decade.  As of 2015, nearly one in seven workers with a four-year degree said that their job required a bachelor’s level of STEM expertise.”  Moreover, 16 million
skilled technical jobs require significant technical expertise.  Given these statistics, it is essential for the United States to invest in NSF’s education programs, including K-12 STEM education, undergraduate and graduate education and training, and informal
education programs.  One out of every four basic research projects at institutions of higher learning across the U.S. is supported by the NSF. 

The value of NSF research transcends consumer technologies and workforce training because discoveries made possible by the NSF help grow American businesses and our economy.  Basic research from NSF-funded projects has been spun off into new companies like
Google, Symantec, and Qualcomm.  The NSF has helped shape major industries like defense, renewable energy, and computer science.         

We respectfully request your support to ensure that the NSF receives at least $9 billion for Fiscal Year (FY) 2020.  We feel this amount is the minimum level of funding needed to prepare future generations to help our nation remain a world economic leader
and to reflect the rising costs of research.  To sign on, please complete
THIS FORM
. Should you have any questions, please contact Dennis Sills in Representative Butterfield’s office at
dennis.sills@mail.house.gov or Christopher Buki in Representative McKinley’s office at
christopher.buki@mail.house.gov
The deadline to sign the letter is March 25, 2019 at 1:00 p.m.     

Thank you very much.

 

Very truly yours,

 

G. K. BUTTERFIELD                                                           DAVID B. MCKINLEY, P.E.

Member of Congress                                                              Member of Congress

 

 

Letter text:

Dear Chairman Serrano and Ranking Member Aderholt:

We write to respectfully request that the National Science Foundation (NSF) receive an appropriation of
$9 billion in the Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations bill.

The NSF is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 to promote the progress of science, secure the national defense, and to advance the nation’s health, prosperity, and welfare.  The scientific research and educational programs supported
by NSF are integral to the continued success of America’s innovation enterprise.  NSF funded research has produced transformative scientific discoveries that have led to new industries, products, services, and enhanced the lives of all Americans.  For example,
NSF-funded research has supported technological advancements such as artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, 3-D printing, next generation computer chips, patient-friendly MRI scans, and threat detection devices.  It has also funded research that addresses
societal challenges such as the opioid epidemic, post-disaster resiliency, learning disabilities and autism.  Many more examples of the impact of NSF-funded research are available in the second edition of
Transforming the World Through Science.

For the United States to remain a global leader in scientific research, engineering, and technology development, the nation must provide greater investment in its people and overall R&D funding. According to the National Science Board’s (NSB) 2018 Science
and Engineering Indicators report, “the number of jobs in the United States requiring substantial science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) expertise has grown nearly 34% over the past decade.  As of 2015, nearly one in seven workers with a
four-year degree said that their job required a bachelor’s level of STEM expertise.”  Moreover, 16 million skilled technical jobs require significant technical expertise.  Given these statistics, it is essential for the United States to invest in NSF’s education
programs, including K-12 STEM education, undergraduate and graduate education and training, and informal education programs.  When making these critical investments in STEM education programs, we must invest in in programs such as NSF INCLUDES and the Established
Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR).  NSF INCLUDES has provided access to research and STEM education opportunities for women and underrepresented minorities, while EPSCoR has provided similar opportunities to all Americans regardless of where
they live in the United States.

In addition to investing in people, the United States must continue to invest in Research and Development (R&D).  Competitor nations are making great advancements in science and technology due to their significant investment in R&D.  Some Asian and European
countries are investing heavily in R&D and the STEM education and training of their workforces.  According to the 2018 Science and Engineering Indicators report, “the U.S. investment in R&D of $497 billion was closely followed by China at $409 billion – accounting
for 26% and 21%, respectively in R&D funding worldwide.”  Should that trend continue, the NSB expects China to surpass the United States in R&D investments by the end of 2019.  To remain globally competitive, the United States must continue to invest in fundamental
scientific research; the very research that NSF funds across the scientific disciplines.

NSF is the only federal research agency that supports fundamental research in these important fields – biology, computer science, economics, engineering, educational research, geosciences, mathematics, and social and behavioral sciences.  Given the breadth
of the research funded by NSF, the 116th Congress must appropriate $9 billion for the agency in FY 2020.  It is important to note that one out of every four basic research projects at higher learning institutions across the United States is supported
by the NSF.  All NSF grant proposals are critically reviewed to ensure they meet the intellectual merit and broader impacts criteria.  The NSF’s expert merit review process is the international gold-standard for the review and evaluation of grant proposals
and relies upon the expertise and knowledge of leading scientists and engineers to ensure that the best research is being funded across the scientific disciplines.  Full funding of the NSF will enable more than 350,000 researchers, including teachers and students
nationwide, to address some of our society’s most pressing concerns through more than 11,000 competitive awards and 8,400 research grant awards.

For these reasons, we respectfully request your support to ensure that the National Science Foundation receive $9 billion for Fiscal Year (FY) 2020.  This amount is the minimum level of funding needed to ensure future generations of Americans are prepared
to help our nation remain a world economic leader.

Thank you very much.

 

Very truly yours,

 

G. K. BUTTERFIELD                                                           DAVID B. MCKINLEY, P.E.

Member of Congress                                                              Member of Congress

Related Legislative Issues

Selected legislative information: Appropriations, Education, Science

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