Sending Office: Honorable Carolyn B. Maloney
Sent By:
Christina.Parisi@mail.house.gov

FY19 Signatures: Carolyn Maloney*, King (NY)*, Johnson (GA)*, Bilirakis*, Payne, Castor, Hastings, Lewis (GA), Danny Davis, Fitzpatrick, DeFazio, Ellison, Sires, Sanchez, Vela, Clarke, DeLauro, DeSaulnier, Shea-Porter, Rush,
Jones, Brownley, Lynch, Lee, McGovern, Takano, Kihuen, Connolly  

FY18 Signatures: Carolyn Maloney*, King (NY)*, Johnson (GA)*, Bilirakis*, Payne, Hastings, DeLauro, Takano, DeFazio, Sires, Ruppersberger, Ellison, Sewell, Danny Davis, Lofgren, Castor, Smith (NJ), Clarke, Lynch, Sánchez, Vela,
Cummings, Rush, Posey, Soto, DeSaulnier, Fitzpatrick, Meeks, Deutch, Chu, Roybal-Allard, Carson, Himes, Lee, Kuster, Kihuen, Schiff, Raskin, Frederica Wilson, Lipinski, Holmes Norton, Pocan, Brownley, Connolly, Doyle, Beyer

Dear Colleague:

As Co-Chairs of the Congressional Caucus on Parkinson’s disease, we ask you to join us in supporting $20 million for the Parkinson’s Research Program (PRP) at the Department of Defense, to restore funding to previous budget levels. 

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurological disorder for which there is no cure or current treatment to slow or stop progression of the disease. It is estimated that nearly 1 million Americans, have Parkinson’s disease. Approximately 10% of Americans
with Parkinson’s disease are military veterans. The disease costs Americans at least $26 billion each year. Without intervention, the prevalence of Parkinson’s is expected to more than double by 2040, and the economic burden of the disease also will increase.
The financial impact and rising prevalence can be mitigated through research to treat and cure PD. 

The PRP’s predecessor, the Peer-Reviewed Neurotoxin Exposure Treatment Parkinson’s Research (NETPR) program, provided the original basis for the current DOD TBI program. NETPR conducted research into head injury biomarkers, advanced knowledge of the biochemical
basis of service member depression and provided greater understanding of neurodegenerative disease risk as a consequence of military service. As a result, the Veterans Administration has begun to recognize the link between TBI and the onset of Parkinson’s.
Currently, Parkinsonism is a secondary service-connected disease when a veteran suffered a traumatic brain injury during their time in the military. Continued research is critical to the care of future generations of military personnel.

To show your support for the PRP in FY 2019, please consider signing funding request letter below to the Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense by
COB Wednesday, March 14.  If you would like to sign the letter or have questions, please have your staff contact Christina Parisi with Rep. Maloney at
Christina.parisi@mail.house.gov or x5-7944.

Sincerely,

CAROLYN B. MALONEY
Member of Congress

PETER T. KING
Member of Congress

HENRY “HANK” C. JOHNSON, JR.
Member of Congress

GUS M. BILIRAKIS
Member of Congress

Dear Chairwoman Granger and Ranking Member Visclosky:

On behalf of all people living with Parkinson’s disease (PD), we respectfully request your support for the Parkinson’s Research Program (PRP) at the Department of Defense (DOD). We ask you to appropriate $20 million to the program for FY2019. Program funding
has decreased from a high of $25 million in FY2010 to $16 million in FY2018. Reinstating funding at previous budget levels will ensure scientific progress of importance to our nation’s service members can continue.

Parkinson’s is a chronic, progressive neurological disorder affecting nearly 1 million Americans.  Approximately 10% of Americans with Parkinson’s disease are military veterans. Currently, there is no treatment to slow, stop or reverse the progression of
PD, nor is there a cure. The disease costs Americans at least $26 billion each year. Without intervention, the prevalence of Parkinson’s is expected to more than double by 2040. The financial impact and rising prevalence can be mitigated through research to
treat and cure PD.

Military service members often are exposed to toxins and other external stressors, such as traumatic brain injury (TBI), which research has correlated with an increased risk of Parkinson’s. PRP is the only government-funded research program specifically
dedicated to PD and the service-related causes of the disease. It aims to identify and understand service-associated PD risk factors in order to prevent or delay the onset of symptoms, as well as to advance the development of new treatments. Funds from this
forward-looking grant program provide the DOD with innovations in material design, avoidance protocols for unnecessary harmful exposures and pathways to develop treatments to prevent damage in the first place.

The PRP’s predecessor, the Peer-Reviewed Neurotoxin Exposure Treatment Parkinson’s Research (NETPR) program, provided the original basis for the current DOD TBI program. NETPR conducted research into head injury biomarkers, advanced knowledge of the biochemical
basis of service member depression and provided greater understanding of neurodegenerative disease risk as a consequence of military service. As a result, the Veterans Administration is recognizing the link between TBI and the onset of Parkinson’s.

Currently, Parkinsonism is a secondary service-connected disease when a veteran suffered a traumatic brain injury during their time in the military. Continued research is critical to the care of future generations of military personnel.

We urge your continued support for this innovative program to benefit warfighters, veterans, and the larger Parkinson’s community.  This research is needed to bolster innovation to meet the emerging demand of a new generation of soldiers.  We appreciate
your consideration to provide the program with $20 million in FY2019.

Related Legislative Issues

Selected legislative information: Appropriations, Armed Services, HealthCare

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