Sending Office: Honorable Gwen Moore
Sent By:
Chris.Goldson@mail.house.gov

This is a Language Request for the FY 2019 Labor-HHS Funding bill

Deadline: COB Thursday, March 15

 

 

Dear Colleague:

Please join me in sending a letter to the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (Labor-HHS) in support of
report language
encouraging the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to increase flexibility into the Core State Violence and Injury Prevention Program (SVIPP), allowing states to focus CDC funding on their highest injury and violence
prevention needs.

The Core SVIPP is the only program of its kind in the US that uses research-based evidence to identify the most effective strategies to prevent injuries caused by accidents or violence, domestic violence, falls, motor vehicle collisions, homicides, and prescription
drug misuse.

Unfortunately, CDC has narrowed the focus of the Core SVIPP program to only the following four areas: motor vehicle injury prevention, youth sports concussion and traumatic brain injury, child abuse and neglect, and sexual violence and intimate partner violence.
These restrictions hinder decision-making at the state level and act as a barrier for states that have injury and violence prevention needs outside the CDC’s four areas of focus. This language would allow states to utilize CDC funds for injury and violence
prevention needs outside of the CDC’s four focus areas.

If you have any questions or are interested in signing this letter, please contact
tatiana.calderon@mail.house.gov.

Sincerely,

 

Gwen Moore

Member of Congress

__________________________________________________________

March XX, 2018

Dear Chairman Cole and Ranking Member DeLauro:

We respectfully write to request the inclusion of language in the FY 2019 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations bill to allow states more flexibility to focus on their highest injury and violence prevention needs with funds received
through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Core State Violence and Injury Prevention Program (SVIPP).

According to the CDC, every three minutes a person dies from a preventable injury or act of violence including domestic violence, falls, motor vehicle collisions, homicides, and prescription drug misuse. This accounts for more than 521 people each day and
190,000 each year in the US. It is estimated that these injuries cost the US $671 billion in health care expenditures, lost pay and productivity, law enforcement efforts, and in many other areas. It is vital that we work to inject greater flexibility into
the Core SVIPP program so that states can truly address their greatest areas of need.

The Core SVIPP is the only program of its kind in the US that uses research-based evidence to identify the most effective strategies to prevent injuries caused by accidents or violence. States rely on the Core SVIPP funding to build, strengthen, and maintain
their injury and violence prevention programs with a focus on four key components: building a solid infrastructure; collecting and analyzing data; designing, implementing and evaluating programs; providing technical support and training; and, affecting behavior
and knowledge. 

Unfortunately, CDC has narrowed the focus of the Core SVIPP program to only the following four areas: motor vehicle injury prevention, youth sports concussion and traumatic brain injury, child abuse and neglect, and sexual violence and intimate partner violence.
These restrictions hinder decision-making at the state level and act as a barrier for states that have injury and violence prevention needs outside the four areas of focus selected by the CDC.

To allow states to maximize Core SVIPP funding, we urge you to include the following language in the FY 2019 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations bill:

Core SVIPP – The committee commends CDC for expansion of the Core State Violence and Injury Prevention Program (SVIPP) to 23 states and its focus on shared risk and protective factors.  To further strengthen state decision-making
and support allocation of funds to high burden areas, the committee urges CDC to allow states to utilize Core SVIPP funds to implement, evaluate, and disseminate effective violence and injury prevention programs and policies beyond the four core focus areas
selected by CDC. Additional areas may include prevention of falls, prescription drug misuse, homicides, and other areas the state deems to be high priorities.

We should encourage states to use federal dollars to focus on their greatest areas of need based on state-level data, not national data. This language will maximize the impact of Core SVIPP funds and provide states the flexibility they need to make meaningful
advancements their injury and violence prevention efforts. 

Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Related Legislative Issues

Selected legislative information: Appropriations, Government, HealthCare

icon eDC logo e-Dear Colleague version 2.0
 

Tagged: