Sending Office: Honorable Kyrsten Sinema
Sent By:
David.Steury@mail.house.gov

        Request for Signature(s)

Deadline: COB Tuesday, March 13

Current cosigners: Rodney Davis, Rush, Panetta, Payne, Jr., DeSaulnier, Lewis (GA), Espaillat, DeGette, Lipinski, Langevin, Danny Davis, Schakowsky, Carson, Cohen, Sewell, Chu, Crowley, Jayapal, Barragán, Lynch, Engel, Schneider, Shea-Porter,
Gomez, Costa, Nadler, Jackson Lee, Kuster, Lieu, Velázquez, Quigley

Dear Colleague:

I urge you to sign a letter to the Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee requesting at least level funding (currently $43.1 million) for Teacher Quality Partnership (TQP) grants for FY19.

States across the country face teacher shortages, decreased enrollment in teacher preparation programs, a growing diversity gap between teachers and students, and challenges in retaining teachers in the classroom. To ensure every student has a chance to
succeed, we should empower the teaching profession to address these challenges in innovative and effective ways.

The Teacher Quality Partnership grant program is the only targeted federal initiative designed to strengthen teacher preparation at institutions of higher education. As institutions of higher education prepare and support nearly 90% of all teachers, a federal
investment in reforming and strengthening these programs is critical.

TQP grants support intensive partnerships between high-need school districts, high-need public schools, institutions of higher education, and other eligible entities to prepare profession-ready, highly effective teachers. Grants can reform undergraduate
preparation programs or develop teaching residency programs at the graduate level. These partnerships require that programs include at least one year of clinical experience, which research shows is crucial for teacher effectiveness and teacher retention. Graduates
of TQP-funded residency programs must fulfill a three-year teaching obligation in the high-need district in which they were prepared.

TQP grantees have had a major impact on strengthening and reforming teacher preparation and on the quality of teaching in communities across the country. Schools and school districts involved in TQP see improvements in the quality and retention of their
teachers and in the quality of their students’ learning experiences and achievements.

It is essential to maintain at least level funding for this program so these programs can continue the important work of transforming teacher preparation throughout the country while deepening the partnerships with the communities in which they serve.

To sign on to the letter or if you have questions, please contact Michael Wong (Michael.Wong@mail.house.gov) or David Steury (David.Steury@mail.house.gov) in
my office.

Sincerely,

 

Kyrsten Sinema

Member of Congress

 

Letter Text

Dear Chairman Cole and Ranking Member DeLauro,

We are writing to urge you to provide at least level funding in Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 for the Teacher Quality Partnership Grant (TQP) program authorized under Title II of the Higher Education Act. The TQP Grant program is the only federal initiative targeted
directly to higher education-based teacher preparation programs, and it is designed to help ensure that high-need schools are staffed with profession-ready teachers. As institutions of higher education prepare and support nearly 90% of all teachers, a federal
investment in reforming and strengthening these programs is critical.

At a time when the profession faces declining enrollment, teacher shortages, and retention challenges, federal investments in solutions such as the TQP grant program is vital. TQP grants support intensive partnerships between high-need school districts,
high-need public schools, institutions of higher education, and other eligible entities to prepare profession-ready teachers. These grants leverage federal dollars by requiring a 100% match and can be used to reform undergraduate preparation programs or to
develop teaching residency programs at the graduate level. These partnerships require that programs include at least one year of clinical experience, which research has shown to be crucial for teacher effectiveness and teacher retention. Grantees are required
to offer no less than two years of induction for their graduates and offer professional development to the school where they are teaching. In addition, grantees must prepare new teachers to teach students with disabilities and English language learners, to
use research and data to inform instruction, and to have literacy teaching skills so that upon program completion teachers are fully prepared for the rigors of providing daily classroom instruction. Furthermore, graduates of TQP-funded residency programs must
fulfill a three-year teaching obligation in the high-need district in which they were prepared.

TQP grantees have had a major impact on teacher preparation reform and on the quality of teaching in communities across the country. In fact, Old Dominion University, a 2009 grantee, solved the STEM teacher shortage in its partner district and continues
to address workforce needs to this day. Through the 68 programs that have received funding via the TQP grant, over 500 high-need public schools are seeing improvements in the quality and retention of their teachers, and in the quality of their students’ learning
experiences and achievements. It is essential to maintain funding for this program so that we can continue the important work of transforming teacher preparation throughout the country while deepening the partnerships with the communities in which they serve.

Thank you for your consideration of this request. We look forward to working with you to ensure that all of America’s students have profession-ready teachers in their classrooms.

Sincerely,

Related Legislative Issues

Selected legislative information:Appropriations, Education, Labor

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