Sending Office: Honorable Christopher H. Smith
Sent By:
AHollabaugh@mail.house.gov

Dear Colleague,

The Department of Labor Bureau of International Affairs (ILAB) has identified the unique circumstances that lead to labor exploitation for children in over 140 countries.  In countries and regions where information is scarce, ILAB funds groundbreaking research
to put a spotlight on exploitation that is hidden in the shadows. 

Every two years, ILAB releases its “List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor.”  The 2016 edition contains 139 goods, 75 countries, and a total of 379 items produced by child labor, forced labor, or both.  Industries use this information to rid
their supply chains of goods made with human trafficking.  U.S. Customs and Border Protection uses the list to keep such goods from entering the United States.  Keeping out slave-made goods puts human traffickers out of business. 

ILAB even works with industries on the ground to help them remove children from child labor, improve school infrastructure, create community-based child labor monitoring systems and action plans, and help families generate additional income so they do not
depend on child labor.  A child that receives an education is a child inoculated from trafficking. 

Please join Rep. Karen Bass and myself in ensuring that ILAB continues to receive the funding it needs to do this critical work. To sign on to the letter, please contact
ahollabaugh@mail.house.gov by COB on January 19th.

Sincerely,

 

CHRISTOPHER H. SMITH

Member of Congress

 

Dear Chairman Cole and Ranking Member DeLauro,

We write to you today to underscore the very important anti-trafficking work done by the Department of Labor Bureau of International Labor Affairs (ILAB) —and to ask that you recede and concur to the Senate language and retain enough funding ILAB to continue
the their very important anti-trafficking grant programs under the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-386) and its 2005 Reauthorization (P.L. 109-164). 

Under Section 105 of P.L. 109-164, ILAB specifically is responsible to do the following:

(A) to monitor the use of forced labor and child labor in violation of international standards;

(B) to provide information regarding trafficking in persons for the purpose of forced labor to the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking of the Department of State for inclusion in trafficking in persons report required by section 110(b) of the Trafficking
Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7107(b));

(C) to develop and make available to the public a list of goods from countries that the Bureau of International Labor Affairs has reason to believe are produced by forced labor or child labor in violation of international standards;

(D) to work with persons who are involved in the production of goods on the list described in subparagraph (C) to create a standard set of practices that will reduce the likelihood that such persons will produce goods using the labor described in such subparagraph;
and

(E) to consult with other departments and agencies of the United States Government to reduce forced and child labor internationally and ensure that products made by forced labor and child labor in violation of international standards are not imported into the
United States.

In carrying out these tasks, ILAB has identified the unique circumstances that lead to labor exploitation for children in over 140 countries.  In countries and regions where information is scarce, ILAB funds groundbreaking research to put a spotlight on
exploitation that is hidden in the shadows. 

Every two years, ILAB releases its “List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor.”  The 2016 edition contains 139 goods, 75 countries, and a total of 379 items produced by child labor, forced labor, or both.  ILAB has made over 1,000 pages of research
on child labor and forced labor available through an innovative mobile app, Sweat & Toil.

Congress uses this information to provide oversight of the State Department Trafficking in Persons Report.  Industries use this information to rid their supply chains of goods made with human trafficking—ILAB even works with industries on the ground to help
them remove children from child labor, improve school infrastructure, create community-based child labor monitoring systems and action plans, and help families generate additional income so they do not depend on child labor.  A child that receives an education
is a child inoculated from trafficking. 

U.S. Customs and Border Protection now uses the “List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor” to keep such goods from entering the United States.  The availability of a high quality report for use by U.S. Customs and Border Protection is more important
than ever as Congress tightened the restrictions on what goods may enter the country last year in Section 307 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1307).  Keeping out slave-made goods puts human traffickers out of business. 

We hope you will agree that ILAB is performing essential and comprehensive anti-trafficking activities worldwide, and that you will recede and concur to the Senate language, “The Committee recommendation includes $86,125,000 for the Bureau of International
Labor Affairs [ILAB], of which $59,825,000 is available for obligation through December 31, 2018.”
 

Sincerely,

                                                                                                                                                           

CHRISTOPHER H. SMITH                                                              KAREN BASS

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