Sending Office: Honorable Rick Larsen
Sent By:
terra.sabag@mail.house.gov

Supported by: Natural Resources Defense Council,  World Wildlife Fund, International Fund for Animal Welfare and Wildlife Conservation Society
Current Cosponsors (24): Beyer Jr., Blumenauer, Bordallo, Cartwright, Engel, Garamendi, Grisham, Hanabusa, Heck, Huffman, Jayapal, Khanna, Lieu, McCollum, McNerney, Moulton, Norton, Payne Jr., Peters, Schakowsky, Slaughter, Titus, Welch, Frederica Wilson

Dear Colleague:

Join a letter to Chinese President Xi Jinping supporting and commending China’s ivory trade ban, which puts a stop to the world’s largest ivory market. In September 2015, Presidents Obama and Xi announced a major joint effort to end the ivory trade in both
countries. Both countries have followed through on this commitment with the United States implementing a near-total ban on our nation’s ivory trade in June 2016 and China finalizing its domestic ivory ban on Dec. 31, 2017.

These bans will not only save the lives of hundreds of thousands of elephants, but will also decrease financing for violent armed groups that derive income through the illegal ivory trade.

If you are interested in signing onto the letter, or would like more information, please contact Terra Sabag of my staff at terra.sabag@mail.house.gov, or at 202.225.2605.
 
Sincerely,
 
/s

Rick Larsen
Member of Congress
 

 

January 19, 2018
 
 
His Excellency President Xi Jinping
President of the People’s Republic of China
 
President Xi Jinping:

We thank you for your commitment to the agreement you made with President Obama to end the global ivory trade in 2015. We are pleased to hear that ivory carving facilities and retail outlets in China have closed and a ban on all sales is now in effect. By prohibiting
ivory trade, this policy will also make it easier to crack down on illegal traffickers, who previously were able to use the legal marketplace as cover.

As you know, demand for ivory motivates poachers, who are responsible for the death of as many as 30,000 African elephants per year. And poaching is not just a threat to elephant populations. Revenue from the sale of ivory finances violent armed groups in Africa,
including those linked to terrorist activities.

The United States’ ivory ban became fully effective in July 2016, and Congress is committed to enforcing this prohibition. By working together, our two countries can stop poaching and ivory smuggling, benefiting all nations.  Praise for the ban has come from
wildlife groups and African nations, including Tanzania, Uganda, and Kenya.

We look forward to working together to disrupt ivory smuggling networks and protect elephants and other vulnerable animals.

Sincerely,

Related Legislative Issues

Selected legislative information: Environment, Foreign Affairs, Natural Resources

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