Sending Office: Honorable Stephen Knight
Sent By:
Adam.Brooks@mail.house.gov

 

Request for Cosponsor(s)

Current cosponsors (18): Speier, McCaul, Eshoo, Cárdenas, Murphy (PA), Comstock, Dingell, Delaney, Brownley, Soto, Tonko, Hurd, Smith (TX), Kennedy, Chaffetz, Duncan (TN), Rush, Costello

Dear Colleague:

May 17 is National Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG) Awareness Day. We have introduced H. Res. 69, a bipartisan resolution which advocates for the official designation of National DIPG Awareness Day and supports increased research into this deadly
disease that only effects children and has a 100% mortality rate. As we near the 17th, we encourage you to join us in supporting National DIPG Awareness Day by cosponsoring H. Res. 69.

Chad Carr, the five-year old whose brain cancer battle became the cause of the University of Michigan football team, brought national attention to an extremely deadly form of pediatric cancer. Each year 200-400 children, typically aged 5-7, are diagnosed
with a cancerous brain tumor in the Pons part of their brain stem, but details about the cases are often obscured in the news, referred to generically as “a rare pediatric cancer.”

In fact, DIPG is one of the more common pediatric brain tumors, and less than one percent of its victims live more than five years after diagnosis. Partly due to the disease’s fatality, which leaves few surviving patients to demand treatment, and with the
media’s silence on the issue, there is no market incentive to research cures. Each and every parent whose child is diagnosed with DIPG is told the same thing by doctors: “There is no solution.” Parents of children in our districts, and in many of yours, feel
helpless because there is almost nothing outside of palliative care that they can do for their children.

In his memory, Chad Carr’s supporters have used the #ChadTough message to break the silence surrounding DIPG. It is critical we continue their efforts to shed light on this devastating disease whose victims are in desperate need of treatments, and of course,
a cure.

DIPG is responsible for the most pediatric brain tumor deaths each year and has maintained one of the lowest survival rates; the median survival time is only nine months. Recently, a study at Northwestern that is supported in part by the National Cancer
Institute, identified potential therapeutic targets for DIPG brain tumors. We must continue to support awareness and research so that we can provide hope for a treatment for our youngest and most vulnerable patients and their families.

This resolution: (1) calls for the recognition of a “DIPG Awareness Day” around which pediatric cancer advocates can organize events; (2) focuses attention on the disease; (3) supports expanded research for treatments and care; (4) encourages the National
Cancer Institute to factor in the number of life years lost when considering disease research grants.

Should you have any questions, or should you wish to cosponsor, please contact Adam Brooks with Rep. Knight at
Adam.Brooks@mail.house.gov or 2-4671, or Molly Fishman with Rep. Jackie Speier at
Molly.Fishman@mail.house.gov. Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,

 

Steve Knight                                        Jackie Speier
Member of Congress                           Member of Congress

 

Related Legislative Issues
Selected legislative information: Family Issues, HealthCare, Science
Related Bill Information
Bill Type: H.Res.
Bill Type: 69
Special Note:

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