DearColleague.us

Letter

From: The Honorable Frederica S. Wilson
Sent By:
antrell.tyson@mail.house.gov

Date: 6/30/2016

Become an original co-sponsor of the Trayvon Martin Commission on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys Act

Deadline for originals is July 6th

Dear Colleague,

I invite you to become an original co-sponsor of the Trayvon Martin Commission on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys ActThis bill establishes a bipartisan commission that will examine social disparities disproportionally affecting Black men and boys in America, offer solutions to address their findings, and investigate potential Civil Rights violations that attract national attention.

Black males face crippling hardships that result in significant disparities in education, criminal justice, health, and employment.  For example, according to the Educational
Testing Services Policy Informational Center, more than 50% of Black male students attending schools in urban areas will not graduate.  This low rate of high school retention directly relates to elevated rates of joblessness and incarceration.  As a result,
Black men are six times more likely to be incarcerated and receive harsher sentences for the same crimes than their White counterparts.  Although the Black male population comprises approximately six percent of the United States population, of the 2.3 million
people incarcerated nationwide, 1 million are Black males.  This is unacceptable.

Addressing disparities plaguing Black males in America will have a promising impact on our entire nation.  This Commission can increase the number of contributing members
of society, bring more people out of poverty and into the workforce, improve the health and wellbeing of our citizens, and produce positive role models to uplift future generations. 

On February 26, 2012, Trayvon Benjamin Martin, a 17 year-old African-American teenager, was racially profiled, stalked, and killed by a man who thought Martin was a “suspicious
person.”  Trayvon Martin is a victim of the prejudice and societal isolation facing Black men and boys.  His death, along with the many deaths of unarmed Black men resulting from racial profiling, are all tragedies that demonstrate the need for a commission
to address the social problems affecting Black males in America.  Creating the
Trayvon Martin Commission on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys
demonstrates that we can come together in a bipartisan manner to improve the intellectual, social and economic strength of our nation. To be added as an original co-sponsor
to this bill, please contact Antrell Tyson at 202-225-4506 or
Antrell.Tyson@mail.house.gov
by COB Wednesday, July 6, 2016.

 

Sincerely,

 

Frederica S. Wilson

Member of Congress