DearColleague.us

Letter

From: The Honorable Carolyn McCarthy
Tourette Syndrome – FY10 Appropriations – Programatic Request> Date: 3/31/2009

Support Funding for Tourette Syndrome Research in the

FY 2010 Appropriations

Deadline: CoB Today – March 31, 2009

Current Co-signers:

Rep. Peter King

Rep. Chris Van Hollen

Rep. Mazie Hirono

Rep. Jason Altmire

Rep. Steve Cohen

Rep. Tim Bishop

Rep. Neil Abercrombie

Rep. Brad Miller

Rep. Mike Michaud

Rep. Barney Frank

Rep. William Delahunt

Rep. Chris Lee

Rep. Tammy Baldwin

Dear Colleague:

As supporters of the Tourette Syndrome Education and Research Program, established by Congress in the Children’s Health Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-310), we respectfully request your support to ensure the ongoing progress made to improve the lives of children and adults affected by tourette syndrome in the United States.

We ask you to sign onto a letter to the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health, and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies in support of continued funding of the Tourette Syndrome Public Health Education and Research Program. This program is administered within the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in partnership with the national Tourette Syndrome Association. With your support for the continued funding of this program, we can ensure progress is made in the areas of education, research and treatment for tourette syndrome.

The program addresses the education and training of medical and educational professionals to ensure proper and timely diagnosis and treatment of children with tourette syndrome. It also calls for a comprehensive epidemiological study of the disorder. Education, training, and general awareness about this disorder will help overcome the social stigma that children with tourette syndrome face each day at school, work, and play and will pave the way for their becoming productive members of our society. This program brings hope to those families affected by tourette syndrome.

If you have any questions regarding this request or would like to sign the letter, please contact Michael Grogan in Congresswoman McCarthy’s office at 5-5516.

Sincerely,

Carolyn McCarthy

Member of Congress

————————————————————-

March XX, 2009

The Honorable David Obey

Chairman

House Appropriations Subcommittee on

Labor, Health, Human Services, and Education

United States House of Representatives

B-300 Rayburn House Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20515

The Honorable Todd Tiahrt

Ranking Member
House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health, Human Services and Education

United States House of Representatives

1001 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Chairman Obey and Ranking Member Tiahrt:

As members of Congress who are committed to improving the lives of children and adults with tourette syndrome in the United States, we respectfully request your support for $2 million for the continued funding of the Tourette Syndrome Public Health Education and Research Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in partnership with the national Tourette Syndrome Association.

Tourette syndrome is an inherited neurobiological disorder that affects children in all racial and ethnics groups. The symptoms of this disorder are rapid, repeated, and involuntary movements and sounds called tics. It is estimated that 200,000 Americans suffer from symptoms of tourette syndrome and endure the stigma, isolation and psychological impact of this disorder. There is no cure for tourette syndrome although some individuals benefit from medication and other clinical treatment.

In 2000, Congress passed the Children’s Health Act (P.L. 106-310). This Act authorized the Tourette Syndrome Public Health, Education, and Research Outreach Programto increase recognition and diagnosis of tourette syndrome, decrease stigma attached to the disorder, and increase the provision of appropriate, effective treatment to those with tourette syndrome.

In year four of the program, Congress passed the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2008 (P.L.

110-161), which included $1.7 million for the tourette syndrome program within the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities at the CDC. The program continues to address the education and training of physicians, allied healthcare workers, and education professionals to ensure proper and timely diagnosis and treatment of children with tourette syndrome. Another critical requirement for improving the lives of children and adults with tourette syndrome is a comprehensive epidemiological study of the disorder. The research component of the program will focus on collecting scientific knowledge regarding this condition. The program will seek to determine the prevalence of the disorder in the general population and the frequency of co-occurring disorders such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Obsessive-Com! pulsive Disorder.

We thank you and commend you for your leadership in ensuring an ongoing federal commitment to the improvement of health and the expansion of research, treatment, education, and prevention of diseases and disorders.

Sincerely,

Carolyn McCarthy

Member of Congress